2016 Caper

 

CR-05 - Goals and Outcomes

Progress the jurisdiction has made in carrying out its strategic plan and its action plan. 91.520(a)

This could be an overview that includes major initiatives and highlights that were proposed and executed throughout the program year.

 

CDBG Program

 

$943,571 in CDBG funds were drawn for the purchase of fire protection equipment an Aerial Ladder Fire Apparatus. An additional $87,004 will be paid to the manufacturer upon vehicle delivery. The apparatus will be housed at the fire station located at 15 N. 3rd St. The apparatus service area (for a primary response) contains 72% low and moderate income level persons. The apparatus is needed to extinguish fires in tall buildings. The apparatus is replacing one that is almost 25 years old.

 

$485,862.69 in CDBG funds were drawn for Code Enforcement activities in deteriorating areas of the City. The Property Maintenance Inspectors conducted 5,595 inspections and the Building and Trades Officer’s conducted 3,619 inspections. The property owner’s used non-CDBG funds to make building improvements. The CDBG Code Enforcement area contains 76% low and moderate income level persons.

 

$250,802.79 in CDBG funds were drawn for Community Policing activities. 844 hours of service were provided and 55 special details were conducted. The officer’s focused on the downtown area and the areas near the schools. The Community Policing program’s service area contains

76.5 % low and moderate income level persons. HOME Program

A new affordable housing rental facility called Homes at Riverside located at 1001 Weiser St was funded for $125,000. The facility includes 46 units with a mix of two and three bedroom townhomes in a three-story interlocking design featuring bride and vinyl siding exterior and individual garage parking for most units. The facility includes a community center, which houses on-site management, a meeting room, kitchen, and computer lab with internet service for the residents’ use.

 

ESG Program

 

Opportunity House used a total of $99,307.00 ESG funds towards the ongoing homeless assistance program. With such funds 435 people were

 

provided with emergency housing and supportive services.

 

Comparison of the proposed versus actual outcomes for each outcome measure submitted with the consolidated plan and explain, if applicable, why progress was not made toward meeting goals and objectives. 91.520(g)

Categories, priority levels, funding sources and amounts, outcomes/objectives, goal outcome indicators, units of measure, targets, actual outcomes/outputs, and percentage completed for each of the grantee’s program year goals.

 

Goal

Category

Indicator

Unit of Measure

Expected

Strategic Plan

Actual – Strategic Plan

Percent Complete

Expected

Program Year

Actual – Program Year

Percent Complete

Code Enforcement Area Building Improvements

 

Code Enforcement

Housing Code Enforcement/Foreclosed Property Care

Household Housing Unit

 

0

 

0

 

 

0

 

0

 

Code Enforcement Area Building Improvements

Code Enforcement

Other

Other

12500

25737

 

205.90%

5200

9214

 

177.19%

Commercial Facade Improvements

Non-Housing Community Development

Facade treatment/business building rehabilitation

 

Business

 

20

 

2

 

10.00%

 

4

 

1

 

25.00%

 

Crime Prevention

Non-Housing Community Development

Public service activities other than Low/Moderate Income Housing Benefit

Persons Assisted

 

49867

 

156780

 

314.40%

 

52260

 

52260

 

100.00%

 

Demolition of deteriorated buildings

Non-Housing Community Development Demolition and Clearance

 

Buildings Demolished

 

Buildings

 

40

 

29

 

72.50%

 

5

 

7

 

140.00%

Development of additional affordable housing

Affordable Housing

Rental units constructed

Household Housing Unit

15

2

13.33%

2

2

 

100.00%

Development of additional affordable housing

Affordable Housing

Homeowner Housing Rehabilitated

Household Housing Unit

21

10

47.62%

     

Development of additional affordable housing

Affordable Housing

Tenant-based rental assistance / Rapid Rehousing

Households Assisted

10

0

0.00%

     

Expansion of economic opportunities

Economic Development

Facade treatment/business building rehabilitation

Business

0

0

 

1

0

 

0.00%

Expansion of economic opportunities

Economic Development

Jobs created/retained

Jobs

100

5

5.00%

     

 

Expansion of economic opportunities

Economic Development

Businesses assisted

Businesses Assisted

12

88

 

733.33%

30

50

 

166.67%

 

Fair Housing

Housing Availability and Housing Discrimination

Public service activities other than Low/Moderate Income Housing Benefit

Persons Assisted

 

1750

 

1886

 

107.77%

 

50

 

663

 

1,326.00%

Homeless and Special Needs

Homeless

Non-Homeless Special Needs

Public service activities other than Low/Moderate Income Housing Benefit

Persons Assisted

 

0

 

1311

 

 

45

 

798

 

1,773.33%

Homeless and Special Needs

Homeless

Non-Homeless Special Needs

Tenant-based rental assistance / Rapid Rehousing

Households Assisted

 

0

 

41

       

Homeless and Special Needs

Homeless

Non-Homeless Special Needs

 

Homeless Person Overnight Shelter

Persons Assisted

 

2500

 

435

 

17.40%

 

1075

 

435

 

40.47%

Homeless and Special Needs

Homeless

Non-Homeless Special Needs

 

Homelessness Prevention

Persons Assisted

 

1000

 

764

 

76.40%

 

1000

 

868

 

86.80%

Homeless and Special Needs

Homeless

Non-Homeless Special Needs

 

Other

 

Other

 

0

 

0

 

 

275

 

0

 

0.00%

Public facilities/infrastructure improvements

Non-Housing Community Development

Public Facility or Infrastructure Activities other than Low/Moderate Income Housing Benefit

Persons Assisted

 

1000

 

850589

 

85,058.90%

 

85383

 

110728

 

129.68%

Public Information Dissemination

Public Information Dissemination

Public service activities other than Low/Moderate Income Housing Benefit

Persons Assisted

 

79073

 

79073

 

100.00%

     

Retain existing housing stock

Affordable Housing

Homeowner Housing Added

Household Housing Unit

0

5

       

Retain existing housing stock

Affordable Housing

Homeowner Housing Rehabilitated

Household Housing Unit

50

0

0.00%

25

0

 

0.00%

Retain existing housing stock

 

Affordable Housing

Housing Code Enforcement/Foreclosed Property Care

Household Housing Unit

 

0

 

0

       

Retain existing housing stock

Affordable Housing

Other

Other

6

1

16.67%

     

 

Youth Services

Non-Housing Community Development

Public service activities other than Low/Moderate Income Housing Benefit

Persons Assisted

 

325

 

333

 

102.46%

     

Table 1 - Accomplishments – Program Year & Strategic Plan to Date

 

Assess how the jurisdiction’s use of funds, particularly CDBG, addresses the priorities and specific objectives identified in the plan, giving special attention to the highest priority activities identified.

 

Please note: The amounts and goals indicated in the 5 year Joint Consolidated Plan are a combination of the City of Reading’s and the County of Berks goals.

 

Progress has not been made on some of the original Consolidated Plan’s objectives due to project commencement delays (such as Major System Residential Rehab Program), redesign of certain programs (such as the Façade Improvement Programs), and the reduction of CDBG entitlement funding from the federal government.

 

The following are the highest priority CDBG funded activities:

 

High Priority - $485,862.69 - Code Enforcement and Rehabilitation of Existing Housing Units. 9,214 Code Enforcement inspections (residential and non- residential) were conducted in the CDBG Code Enforcement Area. The property owners used non-CDBG funds to address the code violations.

 

High Priority - $250,802.79 - Community Policing. The Community Policing Program was conducted in the CDBG Community Policing Area focusing on neighborhoods near each school and in the downtown. 52,260 persons reside in the activity's service area.

 

High Priority - $143,202.77 - Demolition of hazardous buildings. 6 buildings were demolished in 2016. 1 building demolition is underway. High Priority - $48,556.62 - ED and Commercial Facade Improvements. 1 Facade Improvement was completed in 2016.

High Priority - $36,540.42 - ED Microenterprise Assistance. The Microenterprise Technical Assistance Activity assisted 50 low and moderate

 

income level persons.

 

High Priority - $15,000 - ED Special Economic Development Job Creation Activity assisted 1 business. The business created 5 jobs.

 

High Priority - $19,333.02 - Fair Housing. The HRC Fair Housing Program provided services to 663 low and moderate income level persons.

 

High Priority - $16,661.39 (CDBG) Homeless Prevention. The HRC Homeless Prevention Program provided services to 798 low and moderate income level persons.

 

High Priority - $14,882.89 (CDBG) Homeless Prevention. The HRC Landlord Tenant Program provided services to 115 low and moderate income level persons.

 

High Priority - $943.571.00 - Public Facilities (Fire Protection Equipment). 1 Public facility activity is underway.

 

High Priority - $6,036.50 - Public Improvements (Park Improvements and ADA Curb Ramp Improvements). Two Public Improvement activities are underway.

 

High Priority - Homeless Shelter. $118,248.12 ESG funded Homeless Shelter services were provided to 466 persons. High Priority - Rental Assistance. $57,132.43 ESG funded rental assitance services were provided to 222 Persons.

 

CAPER 5

CR-10 - Racial and Ethnic composition of families assisted

 

Describe the families assisted (including the racial and ethnic status of families assisted). 91.520(a)

 

  CDBG HOME ESG
White 10,671 2 558
Black or African American 1,771  2 281
 Asian 154  0 0
American Indian or American Native 37 0 0
Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander 5 0 1
 Total 12,638 4 840
Hispanic 8,025  11 417
Not Hispanic 6,292 5 448

Table 2 – Table of assistance to racial and ethnic populations by source of funds

 

Narrative

 

Additional Racial Categories

Number of Persons

American Indian/Alaskan Native & White - 12 (CDBG)

Black/African American & White - 22 (CDBG)

Amer. Indian/Alaskan Native & Black/African Amer. - 5 (CDBG)

Other multi-racial - 1641 (CDBG), 12 (HOME)

CR-15 - Resources and Investments 91.520(a)

Identify the resources made available

Source of Funds

Source

Resources Made Available

Amount Expended During Program Year

CDBG

 

10,056,568

2,376,985

HOME

 

3,190,404

328,339

ESG

 

446,422

198,037

Table 3 - Resources Made Available

 

Narrative

 

Identify the geographic distribution and location of investments

Target Area

Planned Percentage of Allocation

Actual Percentage of Allocation

Narrative Description

City of Reading - Citywide

 

 

60

 

Infrastructure

Code Enforcement Area

 

24

Code Enforcement

Community Policing Area

 

12

Crime Prevention

 

Downtown Reading

 

 

3

Economic Development

Historic Districts

 

0

Historic Preservation

Table 4 – Identify the geographic distribution and location of investments

 

Narrative

 

ESG and HOME drawdowns are not included in the above percentages

Leveraging

Explain how federal funds leveraged additional resources (private, state and local funds), including a description of how matching requirements were satisfied, as well as how any publicly owned land or property located within the jurisdiction that were used to address the needs identified in the plan.

 

The City’s ESG sub-recipients used a combination of private donations, State funding (Pennsylvania Homeless Assistance Program), and funding from the City of Reading as matching funds for the program. A dollar for dollar match is required for the ESG program, but many sub-recipients exceed the required match.

 

HOME - The City of Reading was determined to be in severe fiscal distress therefore received a 100 percent reduction of match. At least 19.42 percent of City families are impoverished and the per capita income rate was less than $20,966.

 

Fiscal Year Summary – HOME Match

1. Excess match from prior Federal fiscal year

0

2. Match contributed during current Federal fiscal year

0

3. Total match available for current Federal fiscal year (Line 1 plus Line 2)

0

4. Match liability for current Federal fiscal year

0

5. Excess match carried over to next Federal fiscal year (Line 3 minus Line 4)

0

Table 5 – Fiscal Year Summary - HOME Match Report

 

CAPER 8

 

Match Contribution for the Federal Fiscal Year

Project No. or Other ID

Date of Contribution

Cash (non-Federal

sources)

Foregone Taxes, Fees, Charges

Appraised Land/Real Property

Required Infrastructure

Site Preparation, Construction Materials, Donated labor

Bond Financing

Total Match

                 

Table 6 – Match Contribution for the Federal Fiscal Year

 

HOME MBE/WBE report

 

Program Income – Enter the program amounts for the reporting period

Balance on hand at begin-ning of reporting period

$

Amount received during reporting period

$

Total amount expended during reporting period

$

Amount expended for TBRA

$

Balance on hand at end of reporting period

$

0

134,726

134,726

0

0

Table 7 – Program Income

 

CAPER 9

 

CR-20 - Affordable Housing 91.520(b)

Evaluation of the jurisdiction's progress in providing affordable housing, including the number and types of families served, the number of extremely low-income, low-income, moderate-income, and middle-income persons served.

 

 

One-Year Goal

Actual

Number of Homeless households to be provided affordable housing units

 

50

 

0

Number of Non-Homeless households to be provided affordable housing units

 

33

 

0

Number of Special-Needs households to be provided affordable housing units

 

0

 

0

Total

83

0

Table 11 – Number of Households

 

 

One-Year Goal

Actual

Number of households supported through Rental Assistance

 

50

 

0

Number of households supported through The Production of New Units

 

0

 

2

Number of households supported through Rehab of Existing Units

 

33

 

1

Number of households supported through Acquisition of Existing Units

 

0

 

15

Total

83

18

Table 12 – Number of Households Supported

 

Discuss the difference between goals and outcomes and problems encountered in meeting these goals.

 

Regulations prevent organizations from participating, slow progress of projects, significantly increase cost, and limit the number of qualified sub-recipients into the program.

 

Discuss how these outcomes will impact future annual action plans.

 

Many organizations and individuals are not able to meet the stringent qualifications and are not able to participate; many organizations who are qualified will choose not to participate, because of the exorbitant cost associated with projects that do meet the requirements and the paperwork involved in meeting requirements. This decreased interest in participation limits the number of potential sub- recipients and leaves funds unspent in cities where the need is significantly high.

Include the number of extremely low-income, low-income, and moderate-income persons served by each activity where information on income by family size is required to determine the eligibility of the activity.

 

Number of Persons Served

CDBG Actual

HOME Actual

Extremely Low-income

0

7

Low-income

0

5

Moderate-income

0

3

Total

0

15

Table 13 – Number of Persons Served

 

Narrative Information

 

2 new housingunits were created, 1 housing unit was rehabilitated, and 15 households were supported through the acquisition of new housing units.

CR-25 - Homeless and Other Special Needs 91.220(d, e); 91.320(d, e); 91.520(c) Evaluate the jurisdiction’s progress in meeting its specific objectives for reducing and ending homelessness through:

Reaching out to homeless persons (especially unsheltered persons) and assessing their individual needs

 

.

 

The Berks Coalition to End Homelessness (BCEH) provides Street Outreach to homeless individuals and families. BCEH’s efforts reach the City of Reading on a daily basis and areas around the rest of Berks County as they are identified as having unsheltered persons residing in them. BCEH also participates in the annual HUD Point in Time Count during the last week of January where there is a full CoC (Continuum of Care) effort to identify any person who may be living in a place not meant for habitation and to engage them into services, shelter, or both. There are currently three shelters that offer “Code Blue” shelter which is shelter that runs from roughly November 1st to March 1st and anyone who wants access shelter during this time will not be turned away. When someone who is unsheltered is ready to engage in services, a full assessment is conducted by a case worker. The individual or family is entered into HMIS (Homeless Management Information System) and the case management team connects the client with resources and other services. Final numbers have not been calculated but it is anticipated that the unsheltered count will increase from last year.

 

Addressing the emergency shelter and transitional housing needs of homeless persons

 

Emergency shelter and transitional housing are key pieces of any comprehensive homeless system of services. There will always be people who fall into homelessness, but the key is to rapidly assess them and get them into housing as soon as possible and wrap the services around them. Reading currently has three emergency shelter facilities, only one of which accepts any government funding. Two of those facilities are on HMIS, the 3rd one provides data on the clients they serve by request from the CoC and are listed as a partner agency. By conducting full assessments of each individual or family, persons can be more quickly connected with services such as Mental Health, Drug and Alcohol, Social Security, DHS, etc. Transitional housing is also quite important as some people need additional time in a recovery setting or exposed to intensive services before they are ready to be placed in permanent housing. 61% of everyone who entered Emergency Shelter this past year were able to exit in under 1 month. This year placement into permanent housing from transitional housing has been increased by 4%, which means

the success rate of people staying in transitional housing for a proper amount of time to make a successful transition to living on their own in permanent housing has also increased.

 

Helping low-income individuals and families avoid becoming homeless, especially extremely low-income individuals and families and those who are: likely to become homeless after being discharged from publicly funded institutions and systems of care (such as health care facilities, mental health facilities, foster care and other youth facilities, and corrections programs and institutions); and, receiving assistance from public or private agencies that address housing, health, social services, employment, education, or youth needs

 

There are set discharge policies for each of the areas mentioned; mental health, health care facilities, foster care and youth facilities, and correctional institutions. Each one has to abide by their state regulations, but they also have to pledge that they will not release anyone into homelessness. A “home- plan” must be in place before their release is secured. But for the community at-large, there are homeless prevention activities and programs to keep low-income persons in their homes. The Salvation Army, the Human Relations Commission, Family Promise, Berks Community Action Plan, and Berks Connections assist with rent payments, eviction issues, and utility payments. Other homeless prevention activities include legal assistance, landlord-tenant mediation, and housing locator services. Of the people assisted with these services, most all are avoiding homelessness due to our intervention services.

 

Helping homeless persons (especially chronically homeless individuals and families, families with children, veterans and their families, and unaccompanied youth) make the transition to permanent housing and independent living, including shortening the period of time that individuals and families experience homelessness, facilitating access for homeless individuals and families to affordable housing units, and preventing individuals and families who were recently homeless from becoming homeless again

 

As of the last Point in Time Count, there were 0 unsheltered veterans Persons who do have a homeless episode are able to exit that situation quickly (61% able to do so in less than 1 month) even in an environment where there is not easily and readily affordable permanent housing. There are approximately 1600 public housing units in Reading. BCEH believes that there is not enough public housing in Reading. Access to permanent housing for many City residents is out of reach. Reading has over 80,000 persons and a significant number of persons are living below the poverty level. In response

to this problem, BCEH has hired a part time Housing Locator who engages literally homeless clients as well as clients exiting from transitional housing and follows them through being housed and provides case management for them even after they are housed to ensure that they are thriving in their new placement.

CR-30 - Public Housing 91.220(h); 91.320(j)

Actions taken to address the needs of public housing

 

Please see the attachment Actions To Improve Public Housing and Resident Initiatives Reading Housing Authority 2016.

 

Actions taken to encourage public housing residents to become more involved in management and participate in homeownership

 

Please see the attachment Actions To Improve Public Housing and Resident Initiatives Reading Housing Authority 2016.

 

Actions taken to provide assistance to troubled PHAs

 

The Reading Housing Authority is not a troubled PHA.

CR-35 - Other Actions 91.220(j)-(k); 91.320(i)-(j)

Actions taken to remove or ameliorate the negative effects of public policies that serve as barriers to affordable housing such as land use controls, tax policies affecting land, zoning ordinances, building codes, fees and charges, growth limitations, and policies affecting the return on residential investment. 91.220 (j); 91.320 (i)

 

There are no public policies that limit affordable housing. The major limiting factor is the rehabilitation costs due to the age of housing and condition of the housing thus making costs unaffordable to many lower income households. The City continues to provide a subsidy to lower the cost of homeownership by working with non-profits to rehabilitate homes and make them available for sale at prices affordable to lower income households and provide first-time homebuyers with down payment assistance to make entry into homeownership affordable.

 

Actions taken to address obstacles to meeting underserved needs. 91.220(k); 91.320(j)

 

Reliable data collection is necessary in order to assess the needs of the community and to sufficiently address gaps in serving those needs within the community. It was indicated in the past that not only is there a lack of financial resources to address the needs of underserved populations, but there is a lack of collaboration between organizations that aim to serve those needs.

Strides toward proper data collection have been made through new program data collection requirements set forth under programs such as ESG through the HMIS system. By assessing the needs of the homeless population, we have come to learn much about other sub-populations of homeless individuals. This has enabled us to better focus our efforts.

The City of Reading has actively applied for grant resources to bridge gaps in funding for underserved populations. The City is also encouraging strong collaborative efforts between all developers, sub- recipients and social service providers to pool the limited resources and create a seamless service for those in need.

 

Actions taken to reduce lead-based paint hazards. 91.220(k); 91.320(j)

 

All housing units that utilize CDBG or HOME funding are required to comply with HUD's Lead Safe Housing Rule. In addition, the City of Reading has an ordinance that address lead-based paint hazards in housing units.

 

Actions taken to reduce the number of poverty-level families. 91.220(k); 91.320(j)

 

Through the use of its CDBG, HOME, and ESG allocations, the City continued to address the needs of the low and moderate income persons by providing a mixture of housing, economic development and corresponding supportive services, thus attempting to reduce the number of families in poverty. The City’s housing programs, in conjunction with non-profit agencies have increased the opportunity for homeownership and quality housing. The City has also worked with lending institutions to encourage

fair lending in terms of meeting the credit needs of the underserved population in the City. In conjunction with the City’s housing programs, staff in the past has met with local lenders to develop strategies to increase the number and overall value of mortgage written for low-income persons purchasing houses.

 

Actions taken to develop institutional structure. 91.220(k); 91.320(j)

 

The City works closely with a variety of agencies to develop partnerships to identify and respond to emerging needs in the City. By serving on the boards and as advisors to several civic partnerships, the City is able to provide leadership and strtegic assistance to make the programs responsive to community needs.

 

Actions taken to enhance coordination between public and private housing and social service agencies. 91.220(k); 91.320(j)

 

The City encourages subrecipients to partner with one another. Agencies such as Our City Reading Inc,. Neighborhood Housing Services of Greater Reading Inc., Habitat For Humanity, and the Reading Housing and Redevelopment Authorities have previously collaborated on CDBG, HOME and Section 108 Loan funded activities.

 

Identify actions taken to overcome the effects of any impediments identified in the jurisdictions analysis of impediments to fair housing choice. 91.520(a)

 

Three Main Impediments: 1. Limited English proficiency 2. Disability 3. National Origin Actions planned to implement and address the three main impediments: 1. The Human Relations Commission partnered with several agencies such as the literacy council & Hogar Crea to provide fair housing classes. 2. During the fair housing sessions to service providers, the ADA was focused on. An ADA brochure was also developed. 3. Fair housing classes were provided in Spanish which is the predominant language spoken in the city. The outcomes of the actions: 1. The Human Relations Commission was able to reach a wider audience of persons who may not have access through our usual outreach methods 2. More partnerships have been developed to engage a wider audience. 3. Referrals from service providers have increased due to their increased knowledge of fair housing laws and the act.

 

There have been many impediments to fair housing identified in recent years. Complainants filed in the City of Reading’s Office of Human Relations allege discrimination due to national origin, race, and disability. Some even report the harassment of persons of color by landlords and other property owners. Individuals with disabilities also face discrimination. Persons with disabilities requesting reasonable accommodations for a mental or physical disability are more than likely turned down due to landlords not understanding the laws relating to reasonable accommodations or modification. In addition to possible discrimination, other impediments to fair housing include limited opportunities for homeownership and limited housing for families that include three or more children or extended family members. The Human Relations Commission addresses all complaints regarding unlawful and

discriminatory practices through outreach and education, initiating and investigating complaints and providing opportunities for remedy or recourse. The Human Relations Commission collects protected classes status data on their client intake forms. In addition to the important work done by the Human Relations Commission, several City Ordinances have been passed to remedy housing issues faced by residents of the city, including a noise ordinance that requires a landlord to evict tenants that have the police called to their residence three or more times during a calendar year.

 

Human Relations Commission Accomplishments. Fair Housing - The Human Relations Commission responded to 261 Walk-ins, 402 Telephone calls, 356 Cases required action, 4 Federal Fair Housing cases were filed. Homeless Prevention - The Human Relations Commission responded to 257 Walk-ins, 540 Telephone calls, 797 Cases required action. Landlord/Tenant Mediation - The Human Relations Commission responded to: 104 Walk-ins, 11 Telephone calls, 115 Cases required action. Outreach & Education - The Human Relations Commission: Conducted 3 Fair housing workshops with Reading school district, Conducted 1 Fair housing workshop with Real estate investors, Conducted 3 Fair housing workshops at Opportunity House (homeless shelter), Conducted 2 Fair housing workshops at Hogar Crea, Conducted 2 Fair housing workshops at the Literacy Council, Conducted 1 Fair housing workshop at a local church (Bethel), Conducted 2 Fair housing workshops at Salvation Army, Distributed 100 brochures at a health fair, Distributed 350 brochures (Spanish/English) on eviction Distributed 540 bags (which includes information on housing/employment discrimination, fair housing booklets)

CR-40 - Monitoring 91.220 and 91.230

Describe the standards and procedures used to monitor activities carried out in furtherance of the plan and used to ensure long-term compliance with requirements of the programs involved, including minority business outreach and the comprehensive planning requirements

 

Performance monitoring is an important component in the long-term success of the federal grant programs. It helps to ensure that the recipients of federal funds adhere to the purposes and requirements of the programs as set forth by legislative regulations and funds are disbursed in a timely fashion. The three entitlement programs for which the City enter into contracts with HUD are the HOME Program, the CDBG Program, and the ESG Program. Monitoring occurs in accordance with the agreements made between the City and sub-recipients, the certifications the City signs, and the regulations for these programs. Monitoring responsibility for projects funded by the City will continue to be assigned to the City's Community Development Department staff. The City exercises an elevated level of control over the projects and activities of subrecipients of the HOME, CDBG and ESG Programs.

Therefore, monitoring procedures consist of minimum day-to-day contact either by telephone or in person. Instead, the City partakes in the consistent and thorough review of all project documentation in City files, written documentation of expenditures for reimbursement of costs by the City and the submission of written progress reports. For the ESG Program, the City conducts on-site monitoring at least once during the term of the subrecipient agreement. For the CDBG Program, the City selects a representative sample of completed projects for on-site monitoring. For the HOME Program, the City follows the schedule at 24 CFR Part 92.504(e) for on-site monitoring. The City monitoring standards and procedures ensure that statutory and regulatory requirements are being met and that information submitted to HUD is correct and complete.

Minority/Women Business Outreach Program efforts are designed to ensure the inclusion, to the maximum extent possible, of minorities and women and entities owned by minorities and women, in all contracts entered into by the City in order to facilitate the activities of the City to provide affordable housing authorized under the Cranston-Gonzalez National Affordable Housing Act and any other fair housing law applicable to the City. Minority/Women Business Outreach Program is done in accordance with the requirements of Executive Orders 11625 and 12432 concerning minority business enterprises and Executive Order 12138 concerning women’s business enterprises. In addition, that program implements 24 CFR Part 85.36(e) which outlines the actions to be taken to assure that minority business enterprises and women business enterprises are used when possible in the procurement of property and services.

It is the City of Reading's Community Development Department's policy not to recommend for funding activities that are not in acccompliance with the City's Comprehensive Plan.

 

Citizen Participation Plan 91.105(d); 91.115(d)

 

Describe the efforts to provide citizens with reasonable notice and an opportunity to comment on performance reports.

The CAPER advertisement appeared in the Reading Eagle newspaper on March 15, 2017.

CR-45 - CDBG 91.520(c)

Specify the nature of, and reasons for, any changes in the jurisdiction’s program objectives and indications of how the jurisdiction would change its programs as a result of its experiences.

 

The City is not changing any of the program objectives. The City would prefer to select activities that can spend funding more quickly nevertheless it is unable to do so because some of the slower spending activities meet important needs of low and moderate income level persons.

 

Yes

 

[BEDI grantees] Describe accomplishments and program outcomes during the last year.

 

As of March 1, 2016 the BEDI grant balance was $670,290. The building has not been fully renovated and a new developer has not been selected.

CR-50 - HOME 91.520(d)

Include the results of on-site inspections of affordable rental housing assisted under the program to determine compliance with housing codes and other applicable regulations

Please list those projects that should have been inspected on-site this program year based upon the schedule in §92.504(d). Indicate which of these were inspected and a summary of issues that were detected during the inspection. For those that were not inspected, please indicate the reason and how you will remedy the situation.

 

Please list those projects that should have been inspected on-site this program year based upon the schedule in §92.504(d). Indicate which of these were inspected and a summary of issues that were detected during the inspection. For those that were not inspected, please indicate the reason and how you will remedy the situation.

 

Each HOME-funded rental project within the affordability period was monitored, as scheduled, for compliance in accordance with program standards.

 

  1. Berks Women In Crisis

     

  2. Providence House

     

  3. Reading Housing Authority

 

5. Sunshine Homes

 

All of the HOME properties have been in operation for a number of years and sub-recipients are generally knowledgeable about HOME program administration. Based on our new program, the City monitored these projects in 2015 and every three years after. As some of the facilities age, there are ongoing concerns about property maintenance. However, each of the facilities monitored had no codes issues. Regular inspections occur at each of the facilities, and the owners address maintenance issues in a timely manner.

 

Provide an assessment of the jurisdiction's affirmative marketing actions for HOME units. 92.351(b)

 

The City of Reading sees that units and programs assisted with federal funds are affirmatively marketed. In accordance with the City’s commitment of non-discrimination and equal opportunity housing, it has established procedures to affirmatively market units rehabilitated or assisted under the HOME Investment Partnership Act Program. These procedures are intended to further the objectives of the Title VIII of the Civil Rights Act of 1968 and Executive Order 11063.

 

The City believes that individuals of similar economic levels in the same housing market area should

have available to them a like range of housing choices regardless of their race, color, creed, religion, sex, familial status, handicap or national origin. Individuals eligible for public housing assistance or who have minor children should also have available a like range of housing choices. The City will carry out this policy through affirmative marketing procedures designed for the HOME program.

 

During the reporting period, no completed projects contained more than five HOME-assisted units. The units completed in 2015 were not subject to the affirmative marketing requirements. Therefore, the City was not required to assess the effectiveness of the affirmative marketing actions prescribed by 24 CFR 92.351, however, marketing plans for all HOME-assisted programs were reviewed and suggestions were made when opportunities for improved performance were observed.

 

Refer to IDIS reports to describe the amount and use of program income for projects, including the number of projects and owner and tenant characteristics

 

The City recieved $144,426 of program income in 2016 attributable to repayment of past HOME loans.

 

Describe other actions taken to foster and maintain affordable housing. 91.220(k) (STATES ONLY: Including the coordination of LIHTC with the development of affordable housing).

91.320(j)

 

Housing in Reading is considered to be very affordable. In 2015 has performed a market study. The purpose of this HOME Market analysis for the City of Reading, PA is to determine if the current housing market in the Primary and Secondary Market Areas meet the Home Investment Partnerships Program (HOME) affordability regulations at 24 CFR 92.254(a)(5)(i)(B) and HUD CPD Notice 12-003.

 

Specifically, this housing market study is being undertaken to determine if housing units assisted with HOME funds in the City can qualify under the presumed benefit section of the regulations to meet the resale restrictions of the HOME program during the period of affordability. There is no shortage of affordable housing units for any persons who desire to live in Reading.

 

There has been a longstanding goal of attracting middle-income residents by encouraging mixed-income neighborhoods and attractive housing opportunities. The City continues to address the dilapidated housing stock through aggressive Codes enforcement, an active Blighted Property Review Committee, and demolition of structures that are blighted, dilapidated, and/or dangerous.

 

The biggest challenge is the current condition and maintenance expense of Reading’s aging housing stock. To address these challenges, we work with non-profit agencies to administer a variety of rehabilitation and repair assistance programs.

CR-60 - ESG 91.520(g) (ESG Recipients only)

ESG Supplement to the CAPER in e-snaps

 

For Paperwork Reduction Act

 

  1. Recipient Information—All Recipients Complete

    Basic Grant Information

    Recipient Name READING

    Organizational DUNS Number 021446521

    EIN/TIN Number 236001907

    Indentify the Field Office PHILADELPHIA

    Identify CoC(s) in which the recipient or subrecipient(s) will provide ESG assistance

    Reading/Berks County CoC

     

    ESG Contact Name

    Prefix Mr

    First Name ALEJANDRO

    Middle Name 0

    Last Name PALACIOS

    Suffix 0

    Title MANAGER

     

    ESG Contact Address

    Street Address 1 815 Washingto St

    Street Address 2 0

    City Reading

    State PA

    ZIP Code 19601-

    Phone Number 6106556328

    Extension 0

    Fax Number 0

    Email Address alejandro.palacios@readingpa.org

     

    ESG Secondary Contact

    Prefix Mrs

    First Name PATRICIA

    Last Name VASQUEZ

    Suffix 0

    Title CD COORDINATOR

    Phone Number 6106556211

    Extension 0

    Email Address patricia.vasquez@readingpa.gov

     

  2. Reporting Period—All Recipients Complete

 

Program Year Start Date 01/01/2016

Program Year End Date 12/31/2016

 

3a. Subrecipient Form – Complete one form for each subrecipient

 

Subrecipient or Contractor Name: THE SALVATION ARMY - READING CORPS

City: THE SALVATION ARMY - READING CORPS

State: PA

Zip Code: 99999,

DUNS Number:

Is subrecipient a victim services provider: N

Subrecipient Organization Type: Faith-Based Organization

ESG Subgrant or Contract Award Amount: 34672.76

 

Subrecipient or Contractor Name: Berks Coalition to End Homelessnes

City: Reading

State: PA

Zip Code: 19602, 2310

DUNS Number: 831225516

Is subrecipient a victim services provider: N

Subrecipient Organization Type: Other Non-Profit Organization

ESG Subgrant or Contract Award Amount: 18327.04

 

Subrecipient or Contractor Name: Opportunity House

City: Reading

State: PA

Zip Code: 19612, 2303

DUNS Number: 796668481

Is subrecipient a victim services provider: N

Subrecipient Organization Type: Other Non-Profit Organization

ESG Subgrant or Contract Award Amount: 114885.69

Subrecipient or Contractor Name: Mary's Shelter

City: Reading

State: PA

Zip Code: 19607, 1751

DUNS Number: 943176560

Is subrecipient a victim services provider: N

Subrecipient Organization Type: Faith-Based Organization

ESG Subgrant or Contract Award Amount: 9906.5

 

Subrecipient or Contractor Name: City of Reading Human Relations Commission

City: Reading

State: PA

Zip Code: 19601, 3615

DUNS Number: 021446521

Is subrecipient a victim services provider: N Subrecipient Organization Type: Unit of Government ESG Subgrant or Contract Award Amount: 26747.56

CR-65 - Persons Assisted

  1. Persons Served

     

    4a. Complete for Homelessness Prevention Activities

     

    Number of Persons in Households

    Total

    Adults

     

    Children

     

    Don’t Know/Refused/Other

     

    Missing Information

     

    Total

     

    Table 14 – Household Information for Homeless Prevention Activities

     

    4b. Complete for Rapid Re-Housing Activities

     

    Number of Persons in Households

    Total

    Adults

     

    Children

     

    Don’t Know/Refused/Other

     

    Missing Information

     

    Total

     

    Table 15 – Household Information for Rapid Re-Housing Activities

     

    4c. Complete for Shelter

     

    Number of Persons in Households

    Total

    Adults

     

    Children

     

    Don’t Know/Refused/Other

     

    Missing Information

     

    Total

     

    Table 16 – Shelter Information

     

    4d. Street Outreach

     

    Number of Persons in Households

    Total

    Adults

     

    Children

     

    Don’t Know/Refused/Other

     

    Missing Information

     

    Total

     

    Table 17 – Household Information for Street Outreach

     

    4e. Totals for all Persons Served with ESG

     

    Number of Persons in Households

    Total

    Adults

     

    Children

     

    Don’t Know/Refused/Other

     

    Missing Information

     

    Total

     

    Table 18 – Household Information for Persons Served with ESG

     

  2. Gender—Complete for All Activities

     

     

    Total

    Male

     

    Female

     

    Transgender

     

    Don't Know/Refused/Other

     

    Missing Information

     

    Total

     

    Table 19 – Gender Information

  3. Age—Complete for All Activities

     

     

    Total

    Under 18

     

    18-24

     

    25 and over

     

    Don’t Know/Refused/Other

     

    Missing Information

     

    Total

     

    Table 20 – Age Information

     

  4. Special Populations Served—Complete for All Activities

 

Number of Persons in Households

Subpopulation

Total

Total Persons Served – Prevention

Total Persons Served – RRH

Total Persons Served in Emergency Shelters

Veterans

       

Victims of Domestic Violence

       

Elderly

       

HIV/AIDS

       

Chronically Homeless

       

Persons with Disabilities:

     

Severely Mentally Ill

       

Chronic Substance Abuse

       

Other Disability

       

Total (unduplicated if possible)

       

Table 21 – Special Population Served

CR-70 – ESG 91.520(g) - Assistance Provided and Outcomes

  1. Shelter Utilization

     

    Number of New Units - Rehabbed

    0

    Number of New Units - Conversion

    0

    Total Number of bed-nights available

    27,450

    Total Number of bed-nights provided

    21,054

    Capacity Utilization

    76.70%

    Table 22 – Shelter Capacity

     

  2. Project Outcomes Data measured under the performance standards developed in consultation with the CoC(s)

 

Project outcomes are in compliance with performance standards developed by the Berks Coalition to End Homelessness.

CR-75 – Expenditures

  1. Expenditures

     

    11a. ESG Expenditures for Homelessness Prevention

     

     

    Dollar Amount of Expenditures in Program Year

     

    2014

    2015

    2016

    Expenditures for Rental Assistance

    14,599

    33,572

    21,497

    Expenditures for Housing Relocation and Stabilization Services - Financial Assistance

     

    11,202

     

    19,501

     

    29,818

    Expenditures for Housing Relocation & Stabilization Services - Services

     

    631

     

    0

     

    0

    Expenditures for Homeless Prevention under Emergency Shelter Grants Program

     

    0

     

    0

     

    0

    Subtotal Homelessness Prevention

    26,432

    53,073

    51,315

    Table 23 – ESG Expenditures for Homelessness Prevention

     

    11b. ESG Expenditures for Rapid Re-Housing

     

     

    Dollar Amount of Expenditures in Program Year

     

    2014

    2015

    2016

    Expenditures for Rental Assistance

    11,469

    18,572

    17,604

    Expenditures for Housing Relocation and Stabilization Services - Financial Assistance

     

    0

     

    0

     

    0

    Expenditures for Housing Relocation & Stabilization Services - Services

     

    0

     

    0

     

    0

    Expenditures for Homeless Assistance under Emergency Shelter Grants Program

     

    0

     

    0

     

    0

    Subtotal Rapid Re-Housing

    11,469

    18,572

    17,604

    Table 24 – ESG Expenditures for Rapid Re-Housing

     

    11c. ESG Expenditures for Emergency Shelter

     

     

    Dollar Amount of Expenditures in Program Year

     

    2014

    2015

    2016

    Essential Services

    30,668

    17,585

    38,329

    Operations

    41,827

    66,179

    89,435

    Renovation

    0

    0

    0

    Major Rehab

    0

    0

    0

    Conversion

    0

    0

    0

    Subtotal

    72,495

    83,764

    127,764

    Table 25 – ESG Expenditures for Emergency Shelter

     

    11d. Other Grant Expenditures

     

     

    Dollar Amount of Expenditures in Program Year

     

    2014

    2015

    2016

    HMIS

    5,149

    5,000

    0

    Administration

    266

    16,740

    16,584

    Street Outreach

    0

    5,999

    3,467

    Table 26 - Other Grant Expenditures

     

    11e. Total ESG Grant Funds

     

    Total ESG Funds Expended

    2014

    2015

    2016

    506,227

    115,811

    177,149

    213,267

    Table 27 - Total ESG Funds Expended

     

    11f. Match Source

     

     

    2014

    2015

    2016

    Other Non-ESG HUD Funds

    0

    0

    0

    Other Federal Funds

    0

    0

    0

    State Government

    0

    0

    0

    Local Government

    0

    0

    0

    Private Funds

    110,843

    131,881

    187,954

    Other

    0

    0

    0

    Fees

    0

    0

    0

    Program Income

    0

    0

    0

    Total Match Amount

    110,843

    131,881

    187,954

    Table 28 - Other Funds Expended on Eligible ESG Activities

     

    11g. Total

     

    Total Amount of Funds Expended on ESG Activities

    2014

    2015

    2016

    936,905

    226,654

    309,030

    401,221

    Table 29 - Total Amount of Funds Expended on ESG Activities

     

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    Attachments

    Actions to Improve Public Hous'1ng and Resident Initiatives IDIS PR26 Report

    • The report specifies the Planning and Administration Cap, Public Services Cap, and the Slum and

Blight Cap information Emergency Solutions Grant Report

CDBG, HOME, Section 108 Loan Information 2016 CDBG and HOME Action Plan Amendments 2016 CDBG Drawdowns

CAPER Public Notice Advertisement

 

image

 

Actions to Improve Public Housing and Resident Initiatives - Reading Housing Authority - 2016

 

Categories

Programs

Target Audience

Frequency

Description

Improvements To Public Housing

Modernization

Oakbrook Homes &

Hensler Homes

Completed

Smoke and carbon monoxide detection improvements. Work consisted of all construction required to complete replacement of existing smoke detection devices and supply and installation of new interconnected smoke,carbon monoxide (CO), and combination smoke/CO detection devices in utility rooms, living rooms, and bedroom areas within each unit at the Reading Housing Authority's Oakbrook Homes and Hensler Homes (636 units). Future considerations: Monitoring devices become part of Preventative Maintenance Program.

   

Throughout the RHA Developments

Completed

Removed and replaced existing damaged sidewalks and curbing within the RHA developments. Addition of handicap ramps and curb cuts.

   

Oakbrook Homes &

Glenside Homes

Completed

Removed 32 rear porches and steps and replaced with new, larger patios and retaining walls. Provided new landscaped areas and large trees. Future considerations: Further development in this area may require delay due to funding constraints.

   

Oakbrook Homes

Completed

Replaced 72 individual boilers in resident units. Future considerations: An additional 72 boilers are expected to be replaced in 2017. .

 

Preventative

Maintenance

All Public Housing Residents

Ongoing

Repainted 20 occupied units in accordance with Painting Program. Future considerations: Improved methodology as to how units are identified will be implemented as a result of 2016 process.

 

Community

Policing Program

All Public Housing Residents

Ongoing

Contracted with Reading Police Department to provide dedicated police coverage. Designed to serve in a community policing model, officers are charged with conducting investigation and patrol while attending outreach events such as community meetings, youth sporting events, and anti-crime rallies.

 

Program Office

Efficiencies

All applicants, residents and participants

Ongoing

A year-long work group was convened to overhaul the agency's application and recertification documents, in effort to improve efficiency and customer service, and in effort to lead to greater access for persons with Limited English Proficiency. Future considerations: Streamlined documents to be made available via website upon completion of Spanish-language translation and website overhaul.

Resident

Initiatives

Service Coordination

All Public Housing Residents

Ongoing

Delivered short-term, intermittent casework services designed to help residents of affordable housing programs meet acute needs, improve quality of life and increase the likelihood of a successful tenancy. Includes the provision of direct service, information and referral, crisis intervention, mediation and internal and external advocacy. Services are delivered to meet needs associated with physical and mental health, substance abuse, finances, daily living tasks, employment and continuing education, parenting support and child welfare, domestic violence, access to insurances and entitlements, and basic needs such as food or clothing.

Services are voluntary and confidential. Jn 2016, 377 unduplicated residents

, ....,,, ........ ,_, ,....., • ' ............. v ..... ' .............. . ................. ,,...., ............ ...... _. ........... ,. .... ....... ... v ........ , ,................. . ....... ........ ..... ......... ....... ... v L.. ...... _._ ....

       

received 1810 distinct interventions to help with 598 identified problems. Most notably, the effort resulted in the prevention of 126 possible evictions.

 

Resident Councils

All Public Housing Residents

Ongoing

Resident Council functions as the 'united voice' for each public housing development. Council membership is open to all residents of the respective development. Monthly general meetings are held in each location, with agenda items focused primarily upon housing-based issues and planning for recreational activities. Duly elected council officers chair monthly meetings, manage council finances, record meeting minutes, and represent the membership at large in agency policy and procedures. Staff attend monthly general meetings, monthly executive planning meetings, committee meetings as appropriate1 and provide

ongoing support and assistance. The RHA Citywide Resident Council (CWRC)

serves as the umbrella organization for all development-based resident councils, and is comprised of the elected officers of each location. An integral responsibility of the CWRC is to function as the agency's five-year and annual plans. Jn 2016, the RHA CWRC conducted its first annual meeting;inviting all residents 18 years and older of each public housing development. The meeting was held on 6/21/16 with more than 100 residents in attendance. Future considerations: The agency will explore a new approach to training of resident leaders in light of significant changes to key leadership positions.

 

Scholarship

Program

Residents of General Occupancy Developments

Ongoing

Jn memory of long-time board member Stokes Stitt, Reading Housing Authority offers a scholarship program to residents of Oakbrook and G[enside Homes. Two scholarshi ps, each a maximum of $8000, are awarded yearly on a competitive basis. Seven residents received $8,000 in scholarship money in 2016. One recipient graduated in 2016 with a degree in Business Management from Syracuse University.

 

Wellness Program

High-Rise Residents & Oakbrook, Glenside,& Hensler Homes Elderly Residents and Adult Residents with Disabilities

Ongoing

Wellness Centers seek to enhance residents' health and improve their ability to remain in the home environment. Services are delivered by 2 nurses in areas of individual wellness coaching,individual and group education, and wellness clubs and activities. The program utilizes more than 20 partners per year, including serving as a training site for nursing students from a local community college and university. Jn 2016, there were 626 unduplicated residents seen, with a total of 6631 visits, to agency Wellness Centers. A robust collaboration continued with two sites of the local federally-qualified health center, one of which is co-located

on agency-owned property, and meets the resident needs in the largest general occupancy development.

 

Chore Services Program

Elderly Residents and Adult Residents with Disabilities

Ongoing

Through assistance with a contracted provider, elderly residents or adult residents with disabilities may be assisted with housekeeping needs. Services are provided when the resident is ineligible for mainstream programs and when they are willing and able to meet the remaining requirements of the lease and the program. Jn