2015 CAPER

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CR-05 - Goals and Outcomes

Progress the jurisdiction has made in carrying out its strategic plan and its action plan. 91.520(a)

This could be an overview that includes major initiatives and highlights that were proposed and executed throughout the program year.

 

The statistics in Table 1 and Table 2 show that the City of Reading is making significant progress in meeting its five year Consolidated Plan goals. 2015 was the second year of the five year Consolidated Plan period. The most significant initiative undertaken in 2015 (which is not listed in the table) occurred in the expansion of the economic opportunity goal category, the completion of the 209-room, nine-story DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel at 7th and Penn Streets. The $67 million dollar project was partially funded by the City of Reading CDBG and Section 108 Loan Guarantee Programs. It is anticipated that the new hotel will create a total of 150 jobs.

 

Comparison of the proposed versus actual outcomes for each outcome measure submitted with the consolidated plan and explain, if applicable, why progress was not made toward meeting goals and objectives. 91.520(g)

Categories, priority levels, funding sources and amounts, outcomes/objectives, goal outcome indicators, units of measure, targets, actual outcomes/outputs, and percentage completed for each of the grantee’s program year goals.

 

Goal

Category

Indicator

Unit of Measure

Expected

Strategic Plan

Actual – Strategic Plan

Percent Complete

Expected

Program Year

Actual – Program Year

Percent Complete

Code Enforcement Area Building Improvements

Code Enforcement

 

Other

 

Other

 

12500

 

16523

 

132.18%

 

8834

 

7689

 

87.04%

Commercial Facade Improvements

Non-Housing Community Development

Facade treatment/business building rehabilitation

 

Business

 

20

 

1

 

5.00%

 

4

 

1

 

25.00%

 

 

Crime Prevention

Non-Housing Community Development

Public service activities other than Low/Moderate Income Housing Benefit

 

Persons Assisted

 

49867

 

102127

 

204.80%

 

52260

 

52260

 

100.00%

 

Demolition of deteriorated buildings

Non-Housing Community Development Demolition and Clearance

 

Buildings Demolished

 

Buildings

 

40

 

22

 

55.00%

 

8

 

5

 

62.50%

Development of additional affordable housing

Affordable Housing

 

Rental units constructed

Household Housing Unit

 

15

 

0

 

0.00%

   

Development of additional affordable housing

Affordable Housing

Homeowner Housing Rehabilitated

Household Housing Unit

 

 

5

 

 

16

 

5

 

31.25%

Development of additional affordable housing

Affordable Housing

Tenant-based rental assistance / Rapid Rehousing

Households Assisted

 

10

 

0

 

0.00%

   

Expansion of economic opportunities

Economic Development

Jobs created/retained

Jobs

100

0

 

0.00%

   

Expansion of economic opportunities

Economic Development

Businesses assisted

Businesses Assisted

12

5

 

41.67%

10

4

 

40.00%

 

Fair Housing

Housing Availability and Housing Discrimination

Public service activities other than Low/Moderate Income Housing Benefit

 

Persons Assisted

 

1750

 

1223

 

69.89%

 

350

 

556

 

158.86%

 

 

Homeless and Special Needs

Homeless

Non-Homeless Special Needs

 

Public service activities other than Low/Moderate Income Housing Benefit

 

Persons Assisted

 

0

 

0

 

 

0

 

513

 

Homeless and Special Needs

Homeless

Non-Homeless Special Needs

 

Tenant-based rental assistance / Rapid Rehousing

Households Assisted

 

0

 

0

 

 

100

 

87

 

87.00%

Homeless and Special Needs

Homeless

Non-Homeless Special Needs

 

Homeless Person Overnight Shelter

Persons Assisted

 

2500

 

541

 

21.64%

 

1075

 

511

 

47.53%

Homeless and Special Needs

Homeless

Non-Homeless Special Needs

 

Homelessness Prevention

Persons Assisted

 

1000

 

358

 

35.80%

 

820

 

452

 

55.12%

 

Public facilities/infrastructure improvements

 

Non-Housing Community Development

 

Public Facility or Infrastructure Activities other than Low/Moderate Income Housing Benefit

 

Persons Assisted

 

79073

 

158146

 

200.00%

 

79073

 

79073

 

100.00%

 

Public Information Dissemination

Public Information Dissemination

 

Public service activities other than Low/Moderate Income Housing Benefit

 

Persons Assisted

 

79073

 

79186

 

100.14%

 

79073

 

0

 

0.00%

Retain existing housing stock

Affordable Housing

 

Homeowner Housing Rehabilitated

Household Housing Unit

 

50

 

0

 

0.00%

   

Retain existing housing stock

Affordable Housing

 

Housing Code Enforcement/Foreclosed Property Care

Household Housing Unit

 

0

 

0

 

 

0

 

0

 

 

Retain existing housing stock

Affordable Housing

 

Other

Other

12500

16523

 

132.18%

0

0

 

 

Youth Services

Non-Housing Community Development

 

Public service activities other than Low/Moderate Income Housing Benefit

 

Persons Assisted

 

325

 

333

 

102.46%

 

65

 

0

 

0.00%

Table 1 - Accomplishments – Program Year & Strategic Plan to Date

 

Assess how the jurisdiction’s use of funds, particularly CDBG, addresses the priorities and specific objectives identified in the plan, giving special attention to the highest priority activities identified.

 

Please note: The amounts and goals indicated in the 5 year Joint Consolidtaed Plan are a combination of the City of Reading’s and the County of Berks goals.

 

The following are the highest priority activities:

 

High Priority - $646,766 - Code Enforcement and Rehabilitation of Existing Housing Units. 7,689 Code Enforcement inspections (residential and non- residential) were conducted in the CDBG Code Enforcement Area. The property owners made private improvements to address the code violations. In addition, the Clean City Program $34,094 (CDBG) was conducted the CDBG Code Enfocrment Area.

 

High Priority - $226,855 - Community Policing. The Community Policing Program was conducted in the CDBG Community Policing Area focusing on neighborhoods near each school. 52,260 persons reside in the activity's service area.

 

High Priority - $87,283 - Demolition of hazardous buildings. 1 building was demolished in 2015. 1 of the demolitions started in 2014. 4

 

demolitions are currently underway.

 

High Priority - $1,500,000 Penn Square - ED Sect. 108 Loan. 1 loan was issued in 2015. 1 business was assisted. High Priority - $7,187 - ED and Commercial Facade Improvements. 1 Facade Improvement was completed in 2015.

High Priority - $95,482.50 - ED Microenterprise Assistance . The Microenterprise Technical Assistance Activity assisted 15 new businesses. High Priority - $10,243.49 -ED Microenterprise Assistance. 1 grant was issued to a low and moderate income level buiness owner.

High Priority - $400,000 - ED Special Economic Development Job Creation Activity / Family Business Loan Program assisted 1 businesses. High Priority - $470,500 - ED Special Economic Development Job Creation Activity assisted 2 businesses

High Priority - $20,673 - Fair Housing The HRC Fair Housing Program provided services to 556 persons.

 

High Priority - $17,480.24 (CDBG) Homeless Prevention. The HRC Homeless Prevention Program provided services to 513 persons. High Priority - $13,504.11 (CDBG) Homeless Prevention. The HRC Landlord Tenant Program provided services to 113 persons.

High Priority - Homeless Shelter. $83,764 ESG funded Homeless Shelter services were provide to 511 persons. High Priority - Rental Assistance. $53,073 ESG funded rental Assistance services were provide to 452 persons. High Priority - $312,494 - Public Facilities. 4 Public facility and Improvement activities are underway.

High Priority - Development of Additional Affordable Housing. $643,626.52 HOME funded the rehabilitation and acquisition of 13 housing

 

units.

 

CAPER 6

CR-10 - Racial and Ethnic composition of families assisted

Describe the families assisted (including the racial and ethnic status of families assisted). 91.520(a)

 

 

CDBG

HOME

ESG

White

12,142

1

651

Black or African American

2,067

3

291

Asian

166

0

1

American Indian or American Native

65

0

4

Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander

21

0

3

Total

14,461

4

950

Hispanic

9,379

16

430

Not Hispanic

6,953

4

506

Table 2 – Table of assistance to racial and ethnic populations by source of funds

 

Narrative

 

Additional Racial Category

 

CDBG, HOME (Number of Persons)

 

American Indian/Alaskan Native & White - 17,0 Asian & White - 6,0

Black/African American & White - 156,0

 

Amer. Indian/Alaskan Native & Black/African Amer. - 7, 0 Other multi-racial - 1685, 16

CR-15 - Resources and Investments 91.520(a)

Identify the resources made available

Source of Funds

Source

Resources Made Available

Amount Expended During Program Year

CDBG

 

10,056,568

2,369,469

HOME

 

3,190,404

756,936

ESG

 

621,315

206,644

Table 3 - Resources Made Available

 

Narrative

 

Identify the geographic distribution and location of investments

Target Area

Planned Percentage of Allocation

Actual Percentage of Allocation

Narrative Description

City of Reading - Citywide

 

19

Infrastructure

Code Enforcement Area

 

25

Code Enforcement

Community Policing Area

 

10

Crime Prevention

Downtown Reading

 

13

Economic Development

Historic Districts

 

1

Historic Preservation

Table 4 – Identify the geographic distribution and location of investments

 

Narrative

 

The ESG and HOME activities have a City-wide target area.

Leveraging

Explain how federal funds leveraged additional resources (private, state and local funds), including a description of how matching requirements were satisfied, as well as how any publicly owned land or property located within the jurisdiction that were used to address the needs identified in the plan.

 

The City’s ESG sub-recipients used a combination of private donations, State funding (Pennsylvania Homeless Assistance Program), and funding from the City of Reading as matching funds for the program. A dollar for dollar match is required for the ESG program, but many sub-recipients exceed the required match.

 

Fiscal Year Summary – HOME Match

1. Excess match from prior Federal fiscal year

0

2. Match contributed during current Federal fiscal year

0

3. Total match available for current Federal fiscal year (Line 1 plus Line 2)

0

4. Match liability for current Federal fiscal year

0

5. Excess match carried over to next Federal fiscal year (Line 3 minus Line 4)

0

Table 5 – Fiscal Year Summary - HOME Match Report

 

CAPER 9

 

Match Contribution for the Federal Fiscal Year

Project No. or Other ID

Date of Contribution

Cash (non-Federal

sources)

Foregone Taxes, Fees, Charges

Appraised Land/Real Property

Required Infrastructure

Site Preparation, Construction Materials, Donated labor

Bond Financing

Total Match

         

Table 6 – Match Contribution for the Federal Fiscal Year

 

HOME MBE/WBE report

 

Program Income – Enter the program amounts for the reporting period

Balance on hand at begin-ning of reporting period

$

Amount received during reporting period

$

Total amount expended during reporting period

$

Amount expended for TBRA

$

Balance on hand at end of reporting period

$

0

14,600

14,600

0

0

Table 7 – Program Income

 

CAPER 10

 

Minority Business Enterprises and Women Business Enterprises – Indicate the number and dollar value of contracts for HOME projects completed during the reporting period

 

Total

Minority Business Enterprises

White Non- Hispanic

Alaskan Native or American Indian

Asian or Pacific Islander

Black Non- Hispanic

Hispanic

Contracts

Dollar Amount

 

400,802

 

0

 

0

 

0

 

85,000

 

315,802

Number

8

0

0

0

1

7

Sub-Contracts

Number

0

0

0

0

0

0

Dollar Amount

 

0

 

0

 

0

 

0

 

0

 

0

 

Total

Women Business Enterprises

Male

 

Contracts

Dollar Amount

 

400,802

 

0

 

400,802

Number

8

0

8

Sub-Contracts

Number

0

0

0

Dollar Amount

 

0

 

0

 

0

Table 8 – Minority Business and Women Business Enterprises

 

Minority Owners of Rental Property – Indicate the number of HOME assisted rental property owners and the total amount of HOME funds in these rental properties assisted

 

Total

Minority Property Owners

White Non- Hispanic

Alaskan Native or American Indian

Asian or Pacific Islander

Black Non- Hispanic

Hispanic

Number

0

0

0

0

0

0

Dollar Amount

 

0

 

0

 

0

 

0

 

0

 

0

Table 9 – Minority Owners of Rental Property

 

Relocation and Real Property Acquisition – Indicate the number of persons displaced, the cost of relocation payments, the number of parcels acquired, and the cost of acquisition

Parcels Acquired

0

0

 

Businesses Displaced

0

0

Nonprofit Organizations Displaced

 

0

 

0

Households Temporarily Relocated, not Displaced

 

0

 

0

Households Displaced

Total

Minority Property Enterprises

White Non- Hispanic

Alaskan Native or American Indian

Asian or Pacific Islander

Black Non- Hispanic

Hispanic

Number

0

0

0

0

0

0

Cost

0

0

0

0

0

0

Table 10 – Relocation and Real Property Acquisition

CR-20 - Affordable Housing 91.520(b)

Evaluation of the jurisdiction's progress in providing affordable housing, including the number and types of families served, the number of extremely low-income, low-income, moderate-income, and middle-income persons served.

 

 

One-Year Goal

Actual

Number of Homeless households to be provided affordable housing units

 

0

 

0

Number of Non-Homeless households to be provided affordable housing units

 

16

 

0

Number of Special-Needs households to be provided affordable housing units

 

0

 

0

Total

16

0

Table 11 – Number of Households

 

 

One-Year Goal

Actual

Number of households supported through Rental Assistance

 

0

 

0

Number of households supported through The Production of New Units

 

0

 

0

Number of households supported through Rehab of Existing Units

 

16

 

5

Number of households supported through Acquisition of Existing Units

 

0

 

8

Total

16

13

Table 12 – Number of Households Supported

 

Discuss the difference between goals and outcomes and problems encountered in meeting these goals.

 

Due to the high cost to comply with the various regulation, fewer units were rehabilitated. It was projected to complete rehabilitation of 16 units in 2015; however, only 5 units were completed.

 

Discuss how these outcomes will impact future annual action plans.

 

Less units than expected were rehabilitated in 2015 due to the high cost; however, the City and plans in 2015 will expand housing choice through development and rehabilitation of housing. Rental housing was also funded in 2015. 47 new construction rental units are being built in 2015 for the purpose of providing affordable housing to low and moderate income level households.

Include the number of extremely low-income, low-income, and moderate-income persons served by each activity where information on income by family size is required to determine the eligibility of the activity.

 

Number of Persons Served

CDBG Actual

HOME Actual

Extremely Low-income

0

0

Low-income

0

3

Moderate-income

2

1

Total

2

4

Table 13 – Number of Persons Served

 

Narrative Information

 

The NHS HOP Homeownership Assistance Program assisted 8 households in 2015. HOME - All of the recipients were at the low and moderate income level or lower. This is to be expected due to the City's high rate of poverty.

 

The NHS CDBG (Program/Activity Income) funded HOP Homeownership Assistanceship Program assisted 2 low and moderate inccome level housholds in 2015.

CR-25 - Homeless and Other Special Needs 91.220(d, e); 91.320(d, e); 91.520(c) Evaluate the jurisdiction’s progress in meeting its specific objectives for reducing and ending homelessness through:

Reaching out to homeless persons (especially unsheltered persons) and assessing their individual needs

 

The Berks Coalition to End Homelessness (BCEH) provides Street Outreach to homeless individuals and families. Our efforts reach the City of Reading on a daily basis and areas around the rest of Berks County as they are identified as having unsheltered persons residing in them. BCEH also participates in the annual HUD Point in Time Count during the last week of January where there is a full CoC (Continuum of Care) effort to identify any person who may be living in a place not meant for habitation and to engage them into services, shelter, or both. There are currently three shelters that offer “Code Blue” shelter which is shelter that runs from roughly November 1st to March 1st and anyone who wants access shelter during this time will not be turned away. When someone who is unsheltered is ready to engage in services, a full assessment is conducted by a case worker. The individual or family is entered into HMIS (Homeless Management Information System) and the case management team connects the client with resources and other services. Final numbers have not been calculated but it is anticipated that the unsheltered count will be reduced by a quarter from last year.

 

Addressing the emergency shelter and transitional housing needs of homeless persons

 

Emergency shelter and transitional housing are key pieces of any comprehensive homeless system of services. There will always be people who fall into homelessness, but the key is to rapidly assess them and get them into housing as soon as possible and wrap the services around them. Reading currently has three emergency shelter facilities, only one of which accepts any government funding. Two of those facilities are on HMIS, the 3rd one provides data on the clients they serve by request from the CoC and are listed as a partner agency. By conducting full assessments of each individual or family, persons can be more quickly connected with services such as Mental Health, Drug and Alcohol, Social Security, DHS, etc. Transitional housing is also quite important as some people need additional time in a recovery setting or exposed to intensive services before they are ready to be placed in permanent housing. 61% of everyone who entered Emergency Shelter this past year were able to exit in under 1 month. This year placement into permanent housing from transitional housing has been increased by 4%, which means the success rate of people staying in transitional housing for a proper amount of time to make a successful transition to living on their own in permanent housing has also increased.

 

Helping low-income individuals and families avoid becoming homeless, especially extremely low-income individuals and families and those who are: likely to become homeless after being discharged from publicly funded institutions and systems of care (such as health care facilities, mental health facilities, foster care and other youth facilities, and corrections

programs and institutions); and, receiving assistance from public or private agencies that address housing, health, social services, employment, education, or youth needs

 

There are set discharge policies for each of the areas mentioned; mental health, health care facilities, foster care and youth facilities, and correctional institutions. Each one has to abide by their state regulations, but they also have to pledge that they will not release anyone into homelessness. A “home- plan” must be in place before their release is secured. But for the community at-large, there are homeless prevention activities and programs to keep low-income persons in their homes. The Salvation Army, the Human Relations Commission, Family Promise, Berks Community Action Plan, and Berks Connections assist with rent payments, eviction issues, and utility payments. Other homeless prevention activities include legal assistance, landlord-tenant mediation, and housing locator services. Of the people assisted with these services, most all are avoiding homelessness due to our intervention services.

 

Helping homeless persons (especially chronically homeless individuals and families, families with children, veterans and their families, and unaccompanied youth) make the transition to permanent housing and independent living, including shortening the period of time that individuals and families experience homelessness, facilitating access for homeless individuals and families to affordable housing units, and preventing individuals and families who were recently homeless from becoming homeless again

 

As of the last Point in Time Count, there were 0 unsheltered veterans and 3 veterans in Code Blue shelter. Persons who do have a homeless episode are able to exit that situation quickly (61% able to do so in less than 1 month) even in an environment where there is not easily and readily affordable permanent housing. There are approximately 1600 public housing units in Reading. BCEH believes that there is not enough of public housing in Reading. Access to permanent housing for many City residents is out of reach. Reading has over 80,000 persons and a significant number of persons are living below the poverty level. In response to this problem, BCEH has hired a part time Housing Locator who engages literally homeless clients as well as client exiting from transitional housing and follows them through being housed and provides case management for them even after they are housed to ensure that they are thriving in their new placement.

CR-30 - Public Housing 91.220(h); 91.320(j)

Actions taken to address the needs of public housing

 

Please see the CR-30 Public Housing Table

 

Actions taken to encourage public housing residents to become more involved in management and participate in homeownership

 

Please see the CR-30 Public Housing Table

 

Actions taken to provide assistance to troubled PHAs

 

The Reading Housing Authority is not a troubled PHA.

CR-35 - Other Actions 91.220(j)-(k); 91.320(i)-(j)

Actions taken to remove or ameliorate the negative effects of public policies that serve as barriers to affordable housing such as land use controls, tax policies affecting land, zoning ordinances, building codes, fees and charges, growth limitations, and policies affecting the return on residential investment. 91.220 (j); 91.320 (i)

 

There are no public policies that limit affordable housing. The major limiting factor is the age of housing and condition of housing making costs unaffordable to many lower income households. The City continues to provide subsidy to lower the cost of homeownership by working with non-profits to rehabilitate homes and make them available for sale at prices affordable to lower income households and provide first-time homebuyers with down payment assistance to make entry into homeownership affordable.

 

Actions taken to address obstacles to meeting underserved needs. 91.220(k); 91.320(j)

 

Reliable data collection is necessary in order to assess the needs of the community and to sufficiently address gaps in serving those needs within the community. It was indicated in the past that not only is there a lack of financial resources to address the needs of underserved populations, but there is a lack of collaboration between organizations that aim to serve those needs.

 

Strides toward proper data collection have been made through new program data collection requirements set forth under programs such as ESG through the HMIS system. By assessing the needs of the homeless population, we have come to learn much about other sub-populations of homeless individuals. This has enabled us to better focus our efforts.

 

The City of Reading has actively applied for grant resources to bridge gaps in funding for underserved populations. The City is also encouraging strong collaborative efforts between all developers, sub- recipients and social service providers to pool the limited resources and create a seamless service for those in need.

 

Actions taken to reduce lead-based paint hazards. 91.220(k); 91.320(j)

 

All housing units that utilize CDBG or HOME funding are required to comply with HUD's Lead-based paint rule. in addition the City of Reading has ordinances that address lead-based paint hazards.

 

Actions taken to reduce the number of poverty-level families. 91.220(k); 91.320(j)

 

Through the use of its CDBG, HOME, and ESG allocations, the City continued to address the needs of the low and moderate income persons by providing a mixture of housing, economic development and

corresponding supportive services, thus attempting to reduce the number of families in poverty. The City’s housing programs, in conjunction with non-profit agencies have increased the opportunity for homeownership and quality housing. The City has also worked with lending institutions to encourage fair lending in terms of meeting the credit needs of the underserved population in the City. In conjunction with the City’s housing programs, staff in the past has met with local lenders to develop strategies to increase the number and overall value of mortgage written for low-income persons purchasing houses.

 

Actions taken to develop institutional structure. 91.220(k); 91.320(j)

 

The City works closely with a variety of agencies to develop partnerships to identify and respond to emerging needs in the City. By serving on the boards and as advisors to several civic partnerships, the City is able to provide leadership and strtegic assistance to make the programs responsive to community needs.

 

Actions taken to enhance coordination between public and private housing and social service agencies. 91.220(k); 91.320(j)

 

The City encourages subrecipients to partner with one another. Agencies such as Our City Reading Inc,. Neighborhood Housing Services of Greater Reading Inc., Habitat For Humanity, and the Reading Housing and Redevelopment Authorities have previously collaborated on CDBG, HOME and Section 108 Loan funded activities.

 

Identify actions taken to overcome the effects of any impediments identified in the jurisdictions analysis of impediments to fair housing choice. 91.520(a)

 

There have been many impediments to fair housing identified in recent years. Complainants filed in the City of Reading’s Office of Human Relations allege discrimination due to national origin, race, and disability. Some even report the harassment of persons of color by landlords and other property owners. Individuals with disabilities also face discrimination. Persons with disabilities requesting reasonable accommodations for a mental or physical disability are more than likely turned down due to landlords not understanding the laws relating to reasonable accommodations or modification. In addition to possible discrimination, other impediments to fair housing include limited opportunities for homeownership and limited housing for families that include three or more children or extended family members.

 

The Human Relations Commission addresses all complaints regarding unlawful and discriminatory practices through outreach and education, initiating and investigating complaints and providing opportunities for remedy or recourse.

 

The Human Relations Commission collects protected classes status data on their client intake forms.

In addition to the important work done by the Human Relations Commission, several City Ordinances have been passed to remedy housing issues faced by residents of the city, including a noise ordinance that requires a landlord to evict tenants that have the police called to their residence three or more times during a calendar year.

 

Human Relations Commission Accomplishments

 

There have been many impediments to fair housing identified in recent years. Complainants filed with the City of Reading Human Relations Commission (HRC) allege discrimination due to national origin, race, and disability. Some even report the harassment of persons of color by landlords and other property owners. Individuals with disabilities also face discrimination. Persons with disabilities requesting reasonable accommodations for a mental or physical disability are more than likely turned down due to landlords not understanding the laws relating to reasonable accommodations or modification. In addition to possible discrimination, other impediments to fair housing include limited opportunities for homeownership and limited housing for families that include three or more children or extended family members. The Human Relations Commission addresses all complaints regarding unlawful and discriminatory practices through outreach and education, initiating and investigating complaints and providing opportunities for remedy or recourse. During 2015 the HRC accomplished the following: Fair Housing - The HRC responded to 266 walk-ins, 290 telephone calls, 264 cases required action, 4 Federal Fair Housing Cases were filed. Homeless Prevention - The HRC responded to 159 walk- ins, 354 telephone calls, with 513 cases requiring action. Landlord/Tenant Mediation - The HRC responded to 97 walk-ins, 16 telephone calls, with 113 cases requiring action. Outreach & Education - The HRC conducted educational broadcasts on BCTV, conducted 4 landlords responsibility classes, and conducted 6 Fair Housing/Employment discrimination classes. The HRC, the Salvation Army and the Opportunity House distributed 300 bags that included information on housing/employment discrimination, fair housing booklets and eviction process brochures. The HRC participated in Youth Fun Day and Weeniefest. The HRC conducted training on Fair Housing Laws (BCIU), employment outreach (BCPS, Diversity board), housing outreach (PHRC), and distributed 100 eviction process brochure to a District Magistrate. The HRC collects protected classes status data. In addition to the important work done by the HRC, several City Ordinances have been passed to remedy housing issues faced by residents of the city, including a noise ordinance that requires a landlord to evict tenants that have the police called to their residence three or more times during a calendar year.

CR-40 - Monitoring 91.220 and 91.230

Describe the standards and procedures used to monitor activities carried out in furtherance of the plan and used to ensure long-term compliance with requirements of the programs involved, including minority business outreach and the comprehensive planning requirements

 

Performance monitoring is an important component in the long-term success of the federal grant programs. It helps to ensure that the recipients of federal funds adhere to the purposes and requirements of the programs as set forth by legislative regulations and funds are disbursed in a timely fashion. The three entitlement programs for which the City enter into contracts with HUD are the HOME Program, the CDBG Program, and the ESG Program. Monitoring occurs in accordance with the agreements made between the City and sub-recipients, the certifications the City signs, and the regulations for these programs. Monitoring responsibility for projects funded by the City will continue to be assigned to the City's Community Development Department staff. The City exercises an elevated level of control over the projects and activities of subrecipients of the HOME, CDBG and ESG

Programs. Therefore, monitoring procedures consist of minimum day-to-day contact either by telephone or in person. Instead, the City partakes in the consistent and thorough review of all project documentation in City files, written documentation of expenditures for reimbursement of costs by the City and the submission of written progress reports. For the ESG Program, the City conducts on-site monitoring at least once during the term of the subrecipient agreement. For the CDBG Program, the City selects a representative sample of completed projects for on-site monitoring. For the HOME Program, the City follows the schedule at 24 CFR Part 92.504(e) for on-site monitoring. The City monitoring standards and procedures ensure that statutory and regulatory requirements are being met and that information submitted to HUD is correct and complete.

 

Minority/Women Business Outreach Program efforts are designed to ensure the inclusion, to the maximum extent possible, of minorities and women and entities owned by minorities and women, in all contracts entered into by the City in order to facilitate the activities of the City to provide affordable housing authorized under the Cranston-Gonzalez National Affordable Housing Act and any other fair housing law applicable to the City. Minority/Women Business Outreach Program is done in accordance with the requirements of Executive Orders 11625 and 12432 concerning minority business enterprises and Executive Order 12138 concerning women’s business enterprises. In addition, that program implements 24 CFR Part 85.36(e) which outlines the actions to be taken to assure that minority business enterprises and women business enterprises are used when possible in the procurement of property and services.

 

It is the City of Reading's Community Development Department's policy not to recommend for funding activities that are not in accordance with the City's Comprehensive Plan.

 

Citizen Participation Plan 91.105(d); 91.115(d)

 

Describe the efforts to provide citizens with reasonable notice and an opportunity to comment on performance reports.

 

The CAPER advertisement was placed in the Reading Eagle newspaper on March 15, 2016.

CR-45 - CDBG 91.520(c)

Specify the nature of, and reasons for, any changes in the jurisdiction’s program objectives and indications of how the jurisdiction would change its programs as a result of its experiences.

 

The City is not changing any of the program objectives. The City would prefer to select activities that spend funding more quickly nevertheless it is unable to do so because some of the slower spending activities meet important needs of low and moderate income level persons.

 

Yes

 

[BEDI grantees] Describe accomplishments and program outcomes during the last year.

 

The BEDI is currently being used for the redevelopment of buildings that the City has purchased on the 500 block of Penn Street. The buildings are planned to be redeveloped for economic development purposes, such as for lease to third parties for mixed-commercial uses, including retail, restaurant, office, and work/live residential uses for artists and other entrepreneurs and as an incubator for business development.

CR-50 - HOME 91.520(d)

Include the results of on-site inspections of affordable rental housing assisted under the program to determine compliance with housing codes and other applicable regulations

Please list those projects that should have been inspected on-site this program year based upon the schedule in §92.504(d). Indicate which of these were inspected and a summary of issues that were detected during the inspection. For those that were not inspected, please indicate the reason and how you will remedy the situation.

 

Each HOME-funded rental project within the affordability period was monitored, as scheduled, for compliance in accordance with program standards.

 

  1. Berks Women In Crisis

     

  2. Providence House

     

  3. Reading Housing Authority

 

5. Sunshine Homes

 

All of the HOME properties have been in operation for a number of years and sub-recipients are generally knowledgeable about HOME program administration. Based on our new program, the

City monitored these projects in 2015 and every three years after. As some of the facilities age, there are ongoing concerns about property maintenance. However, each of the facilities monitored had no codes issues. Regular inspections occur at each of the facilities, and the owners address maintenance issues in a timely manner.

 

Provide an assessment of the jurisdiction's affirmative marketing actions for HOME units. 92.351(b)

 

The City of Reading sees that units and programs assisted with federal funds are affirmatively marketed. In accordance with the City’s commitment of non-discrimination and equal opportunity housing, it has established procedures to affirmatively market units rehabilitated or assisted under the HOME Investment Partnership Act Program. These procedures are intended to further the objectives of the Title VIII of the Civil Rights Act of 1968 and Executive Order 11063.

 

The City believes that individuals of similar economic levels in the same housing market area should have available to them a like range of housing choices regardless of their race, color, creed, religion, sex, familial status, handicap or national origin. Individuals eligible for public housing assistance or who have minor children should also have available a like range of housing choices. The City will carry out this

policy through affirmative marketing procedures designed for the HOME program.

 

During the reporting period, no completed projects contained more than five HOME-assisted units. The units completed in 2015 were not subject to the affirmative marketing requirements. Therefore, the City was not required to assess the effectiveness of the affirmative marketing actions prescribed by 24 CFR 92.351, however, marketing plans for all HOME-assisted programs were reviewed and suggestions were made when opportunities for improved performance were observed.

 

Refer to IDIS reports to describe the amount and use of program income for projects, including the number of projects and owner and tenant characteristics

 

The City recieved $14,600 of program income in 2015 attributable to repayment of past HOME loans

 

Describe other actions taken to foster and maintain affordable housing. 91.220(k) (STATES ONLY: Including the coordination of LIHTC with the development of affordable housing).

91.320(j)

 

Housing in Reading is considered to be very affordable. In 2015 has performed a market study. The purpose of this HOME Market analysis for the City of Reading, PA is to determine if the current housing market in the Primary and Secondary Market Areas meet the Home Investment Partnerships Program (HOME) affordability regulations at 24 CFR 92.254(a)(5)(i)(B) and HUD CPD Notice 12-003.

 

Specifically, this housing market study is being undertaken to determine if housing units assisted with HOME funds in the City can qualify under the presumed benefit section of the regulations to meet the resale restrictions of the HOME program during the period of affordability. There is no shortage of affordable housing units for any persons who desire to live in Reading.

 

There has been a longstanding goal of attracting middle-income residents by encouraging mixed- income neighborhoods and attractive housing opportunities. The City continues to address the dilapidated housing stock through aggressive Codes enforcement, an active Blighted Property Review Committee, and demolition of structures that are blighted, dilapidated, and/or dangerous.

 

The biggest challenge is the current condition and maintenance expense of Reading’s aging housing stock. To address these challenges, we work with non-profit agencies to administer a variety of rehabilitation and repair assistance programs. (See IDIS PR23 report for more detailed information.)

CR-60 - ESG 91.520(g) (ESG Recipients only)

ESG Supplement to the CAPER in e-snaps

 

For Paperwork Reduction Act

 

  1. Recipient Information—All Recipients Complete

    Basic Grant Information

    Recipient Name READING

    Organizational DUNS Number 021446521

    EIN/TIN Number 236001907

    Indentify the Field Office PHILADELPHIA

    Identify CoC(s) in which the recipient or subrecipient(s) will provide ESG assistance

    Reading/Berks County CoC

     

    ESG Contact Name

    Prefix Mr

    First Name ALEJANDRO

    Middle Name 0

    Last Name PALACIOS

    Suffix 0

    Title MANAGER

     

    ESG Contact Address

    Street Address 1 815 Washingto St

    Street Address 2 0

    City Reading

    State PA

    ZIP Code 19601-

    Phone Number 6106556328

    Extension 0

    Fax Number 0

    Email Address alejandro.palacios@readingpa.org

     

    ESG Secondary Contact Prefix

    First Name Last Name Suffix

    Title

    Phone Number Extension Email Address

  2. Reporting Period—All Recipients Complete

 

Program Year Start Date 01/01/2015

Program Year End Date 12/31/2015

 

3a. Subrecipient Form – Complete one form for each subrecipient

 

Subrecipient or Contractor Name: READING

City: Reading

State: PA

Zip Code: 19601, 3615

DUNS Number: 021446521

Is subrecipient a victim services provider: N

Subrecipient Organization Type: Other Non-Profit Organization

ESG Subgrant or Contract Award Amount: 16741

 

Subrecipient or Contractor Name: Berks Coalition to End Homelessnes

City: Reading

State: PA

Zip Code: 19602, 2310

DUNS Number: 831225516

Is subrecipient a victim services provider: N

Subrecipient Organization Type: Other Non-Profit Organization

ESG Subgrant or Contract Award Amount: 60927.2

 

Subrecipient or Contractor Name: Opportunity House

City: Reading

State: PA

Zip Code: 19612, 2303

DUNS Number: 796668481

Is subrecipient a victim services provider: N

Subrecipient Organization Type: Other Non-Profit Organization

ESG Subgrant or Contract Award Amount: 101264.4

Subrecipient or Contractor Name: Mary's Shelter

City: Reading

State: PA

Zip Code: 19607, 1751

DUNS Number: 943176560

Is subrecipient a victim services provider: N

Subrecipient Organization Type: Other Non-Profit Organization

ESG Subgrant or Contract Award Amount: 16735

 

Subrecipient or Contractor Name: City of Reading Human Relations Commission

City: Reading

State: PA

Zip Code: 19601, 3615

DUNS Number: 021446521

Is subrecipient a victim services provider: N

Subrecipient Organization Type: Other Non-Profit Organization

ESG Subgrant or Contract Award Amount: 27543.4

CR-65 - Persons Assisted

  1. Persons Served

     

    4a. Complete for Homelessness Prevention Activities

     

    Number of Persons in Households

    Total

    Adults

    160

    Children

    202

    Don't Know/Refused/Other

    0

    Missing Information

    0

    Total

    362

    Table 14 – Household Information for Homeless Prevention Activities

     

    4b. Complete for Rapid Re-Housing Activities

     

    Number of Persons in Households

    Total

    Adults

    44

    Children

    43

    Don't Know/Refused/Other

    0

    Missing Information

    0

    Total

    87

    Table 15 – Household Information for Rapid Re-Housing Activities

     

    4c. Complete for Shelter

     

    Number of Persons in Households

    Total

    Adults

    427

    Children

    84

    Don't Know/Refused/Other

    0

    Missing Information

    0

    Total

    511

    Table 16 – Shelter Information

     

    4d. Street Outreach

     

    Number of Persons in Households

    Total

    Adults

    0

    Children

    0

    Don't Know/Refused/Other

    0

    Missing Information

    0

    Total

    0

    Table 17 – Household Information for Street Outreach

     

    4e. Totals for all Persons Served with ESG

     

    Number of Persons in Households

    Total

    Adults

    618

    Children

    318

    Don't Know/Refused/Other

    0

    Missing Information

    0

    Total

    936

    Table 18 – Household Information for Persons Served with ESG

     

  2. Gender—Complete for All Activities

     

     

    Total

    Male

    450

    Female

    486

    Transgender

    0

    Don't Know/Refused/Other

    0

    Missing Information

    0

    Total

    936

    Table 19 – Gender Information

  3. Age—Complete for All Activities

     

     

    Total

    Under 18

    318

    18-24

    116

    25 and over

    502

    Don't Know/Refused/Other

    0

    Missing Information

    0

    Total

    936

    Table 20 – Age Information

     

  4. Special Populations Served—Complete for All Activities

 

Number of Persons in Households

Subpopulation

Total

Total Persons Served – Prevention

Total Persons Served – RRH

Total Persons Served in Emergency Shelters

Veterans

83

4

0

79

Victims of Domestic Violence

 

95

 

31

 

12

 

56

Elderly

34

8

1

25

HIV/AIDS

5

0

0

5

Chronically Homeless

 

42

 

0

 

0

 

40

Persons with Disabilities:

Severely Mentally Ill

 

95

 

13

 

6

 

86

Chronic Substance Abuse

 

68

 

4

 

0

 

64

Other Disability

95

25

8

63

Total (Unduplicated if possible)

 

301

 

61

 

21

 

227

Table 21 – Special Population Served

CR-70 – ESG 91.520(g) - Assistance Provided and Outcomes

  1. Shelter Utilization

     

    Number of New Units - Rehabbed

    0

    Number of New Units - Conversion

    95

    Total Number of bed-nights available

    34,675

    Total Number of bed-nights provided

    28,236

    Capacity Utilization

    81.43%

    Table 22 – Shelter Capacity

     

  2. Project Outcomes Data measured under the performance standards developed in consultation with the CoC(s)

 

Project outcomes are in compliance with performance standards developed by the Berks Coalition to End Homelessness.

CR-75 – Expenditures

11. Expenditures

 

11a. ESG Expenditures for Homelessness Prevention

 

 

Dollar Amount of Expenditures in Program Year

 

2013

2014

2015

Expenditures for Rental Assistance

31,790

14,599

33,572

Expenditures for Housing Relocation and Stabilization Services - Financial Assistance

 

17,124

 

11,202

 

19,501

Expenditures for Housing Relocation & Stabilization Services - Services

 

3,608

 

631

 

0

Expenditures for Homeless Prevention under Emergency Shelter Grants Program

 

0

 

0

 

0

Subtotal Homelessness Prevention

52,522

26,432

53,073

Table 23 – ESG Expenditures for Homelessness Prevention

 

11b. ESG Expenditures for Rapid Re-Housing

 

 

Dollar Amount of Expenditures in Program Year

 

2013

2014

2015

Expenditures for Rental Assistance

0

11,649

18,572

Expenditures for Housing Relocation and Stabilization Services - Financial Assistance

 

0

 

0

 

0

Expenditures for Housing Relocation & Stabilization Services - Services

 

0

 

0

 

0

Expenditures for Homeless Assistance under Emergency Shelter Grants Program

 

0

 

0

 

0

Subtotal Rapid Re-Housing

0

11,649

18,572

Table 24 – ESG Expenditures for Rapid Re-Housing

 

11c. ESG Expenditures for Emergency Shelter

 

 

Dollar Amount of Expenditures in Program Year

 

2013

2014

2015

Essential Services

30,668

30,668

17,585

Operations

71,559

41,827

66,179

Renovation

0

0

0

Major Rehab

0

0

0

Conversion

0

0

0

Subtotal

102,227

72,495

83,764

Table 25 – ESG Expenditures for Emergency Shelter

 

11d. Other Grant Expenditures

 

 

Dollar Amount of Expenditures in Program Year

 

2013

2014

2015

HMIS

12,778

5,149

5,000

Administration

0

266

16,740

Street Outreach

0

0

5,999

Table 26 - Other Grant Expenditures

 

11e. Total ESG Grant Funds

 

Total ESG Funds Expended

2013

2014

2015

460,667

167,527

115,991

177,149

Table 27 - Total ESG Funds Expended

 

11f. Match Source

 

 

2013

2014

2015

Other Non-ESG HUD Funds

12,000

0

0

Other Federal Funds

0

0

0

State Government

0

0

0

Local Government

0

0

0

Private Funds

144,410

110,843

131,881

Other

11,119

0

0

Fees

0

0

0

Program Income

0

0

0

Total Match Amount

167,529

110,843

131,881

Table 28 - Other Funds Expended on Eligible ESG Activities

 

11g. Total

 

Total Amount of Funds Expended on ESG Activities

2013

2014

2015

870,920

335,056

226,834

309,030

Table 29 - Total Amount of Funds Expended on ESG Activities

Attachment

PR 26 Report Admin Cap Public Service Cap Low Mod Benefit

 

image

 

imageimageimage

CDBG funds spent in 2015

 

PY

Activity Name

Address

Draw Thru 2015

Draw In 2015

Description

Accomplishment

 

2013

11th and Pike Fieldhouse

11th and Pike Sts.

$255,289.50

$29,518.06

 

HVAC improvements

Project complete, final retainage invoice pending

 

2013

Keffer Park Improvements

 

301 Exeter St.

$127,596.08

$29,990.98

 

Park Improvements

Project complete, final retainage invoice pending

 

2014

11th and Pike Playground

11th and Pike Sts.

$208,990.60

$205,686.71

Playground Improvements

Constuction underway, to be completed in 2016

 

2014

 

Emergency Demolition

Citywide Activity

$208,681.00

$26,500.00

Emergency demolitions ordered by the Building Official

 

1 demolition in 2015

 

2014

Micro-Enterprise Grant - Dele Olaewe / Cure Sports

 

126 N. 5th St.

$10,243.49

$10,243.49

Purchase of equipment

Awarded a grant to 1 Micro-Enterprise

2014

844 Centre Ave. Facade Improvement

844 Centre Ave.

$7,187.09

$7,187.09

Façade Improvement Project

1 façade improvement completed

2015

CDBG Program Administration

N/A

$458,483.56

$458,483.56

Administration costs

N/A

 

2015

 

Code Enforcement - PMI

CDBG Code Enforcement Area

$404,999.70

$404,999.70

Enforcement of Codes in low/mod deteriorating areas

4,190 inspections conducted

 

2015

Code Enforcement - Trades

CDBG Code Enforcement Area

$146,766.66

$146,766.66

Enforcement of Codes in low/mod deteriorating areas

3,499 inspections conducted

 

2015

Microenterprise Technical Assistance

Citywide Activity

$95,482.50

$95,482.50

Technical assistance to low/mod Micro- Enterprises

15 New Micro- Enterprises Technical Asstistance.

 

2015

 

Emergency Demolition

 

Citywide Activity

 

$61,163.00

 

$61,163.00

Emergency demolitions ordered by the Building Official

1 demolition

completed, 4 demolitions are underway

 

2015

729 N. 5th St.

Residential Facade Improvement

 

729 N. 5th St.

$5,560.00

$5,560.00

Façade Improvement Project

1 façade improvement completed

 

2015

 

Community Policing

CDBG

Community Policing Area

$226,855.00

$226,855.00

Community Policing focused on school areas

52,260 persons reside in the service area

 

2015

Human Relations Commission Homelessness Prevention

 

Citywide Activity

 

$17,480.24

 

$17,480.24

 

Homeless prevention services

 

513 persons assisted

 

2015

Human Relations Commission Fair Housing

Citywide Activity

$20,673.50

$20,673.50

Fair Housing education and enforcenment

 

556 persons assisted

 

2015

Human Relations Commission Landlord Tenant Mediation

Citywide Activity

$13,504.11

$13,504.11

Landlord tenant mediation

 

113 persons assisted

 

2015

 

Clean City Program

 

N/A

$34,094.31

$34,094.31

Clean City Program in the CDBG Code Enforcement Area

64,020 persons reside in the service area

2015

ADA Curb Ramps

18th Ward

$47,298.54

$47,298.54

ADA Curb Ramps Project

Project is in the design phase

2015

Penn Square MT LP - SEDA Job Creation Loan

5th and Penn Sts.

$300,000.00

$300,000.00

Working capital loan

1 business assisted

 

2015

SEDA Job Creation Loan

- Grill Then Chill Bar

400 Woodward St.

$170,500.00

$170,500.00

Working capital, machinery, and equipment

 

1 business assisted

 

2015

Hispanic Center Parental Engagement Program

5th and Washington Sts.

$23,831.30

$23,831.30

Parental education program

64 persons served

2015

Hispanic Center Safety Net Program

5th and Washington Sts.

$20,267.00

$20,267.00

Social Services Referral Program

3,316 persons served

 

Total $2,343,149.20

 

 

 

2015

Reading Soda Works - CDBG funds from Revolving Loan Fund*

 

606 Gregg Ave.

 

$400,000*

 

$400,000*

 

Working Capital Loan

 

1 business assisted

Resident Initiatives Reading Housing Authority 2015

 

image

image

 

Loan Information BEDI NHS HOP Loans Action Plan Amendment

Family Business Loan Program Account

One loan issued in 2015 in the amount of $400,000

$173,028.63 is the account balance as of 12/31/2015.

 

The loan name and amount of Section 108 Loan funds received from HUD - Penn Square $1,500,000

The loan name and amount of Section 108 Loan funds that were disbursed to a developer - $0 The loan name and amount of Section 108 Loan payments received from loan recipients

(and the amount of loan payments remitted to HUD)

 

Hydrojet/Buttonwood Gateway - Received $39,160.78 - Paid To HUD $57,987.47 Sunrich/Buttonwood Gateway - Received $64,841.45 - Paid To HUD $120,435.50 KVP/Habasit - Received $750,000 - Paid To HUD $750,957.90

Goggleworks Apts. - Received $0 - Paid To HUD $34,511.94

Reading’s Future/Sovereign Plaza - Received $320,260 - Paid to HUD $515,170.00 Doubletree Hotel (Loan 1) - Received $3,407.85 - Paid to HUD $8,048.85 Doubletree Hotel (Loan 2) Received $3,596.86 - Paid To HUD $9,390.68

Penn Square - Received $0 - Paid to HUD $3,204.30

 

The amount BEDI (or EDI) funds received from HUD $750,000

 

The name and amount BEDI (or EDI) funds that were disbursed to a developer $ 750,000

 

The principal balance for each CDBG, HOME float-funded activity outstanding as of the end of the reporting period and the date(s) by which the funds are expected to be received (see table)

 

The total number of CDBG, HOME, and Section 108 Loans outstanding and the principal balance owed as of the end of the reporting period (see table)

 

The total number of outstanding loans that are deferred or forgivable, the principal balance owed as of the end of the reporting period, and the terms of the deferral or forgiveness

 

The total number and amount of loans that have gone into default and for which the balance was forgiven or written off during the reporting period

 

HOME Action Plan Amendments in 2015 - 247 Washington St. – Changed the Residential Acquisition / Rehab / Resale Project to a Rental Project - $139,434.62

 

The Neighborhood Housing Services Home Ownership HOP Loan Program received $31,514 in CDBG program income in 2015. They issued two loans to low and moderate income level households.

2015 Loan Reporting

 

 

Loan # Name

Principal

Balance O/S Terms of Deferral or Forgiveness

 

"15-01-01

Rdg Parking Authority

69,220.78

 

"17-01-03

Crescent Brass

38,305.17

Bankruptcy-court stip pmt

"19-01-01

Price Design Resources

63,966.81

 

"26-01-01

Sandi Salads

22,444.37

 

"26-01-02

Sandi Salads

37,995.60

 

"36-01-01

Rdg Housing Opportunities

105,046.23

Payments deferred until 2010

"36-01-02

Rdg Housing Opportunities

49,000.00

Payments deferred until 2010

"36-01-03

Rdg Housing Opportunities

72,950.00

Payments deferred until 2010

"100-01-01

Dryler Products Inc

13,875.62

Bankruptcy-have not rec'd court papers to write off

"107-01-01

Renato Brunas Holdings

24,606.71

 

"111-01-01

NHS (Mayflower Apts)

130,650.00

 

"115-01-01

Donald & Linda Dahms

30,000.00

 

"118-01-01

Rdg Railcar

20,974.17

 

"118-01-02

Rdg Railcar

41,944.55

 

"121-01-01

Senior Apts @ Wyo Club

248,905.88

Balloon Payment Due 7/22/2028

"121-01-02

Senior Apts @ Wyo Club

360,000.00

Balloon Payment Due 7/22/2028

"121-01-03

Senior Apts @ Wyo Club

470,307.00

Balloon Payment Due 7/22/2028

"121-01-04

Senior Apts @ Wyo Club

129,693.00

Balloon Payment Due 7/22/2028

"126-01-01

River Oak Partners

1,475,000.00

First Payment Due 1/1/2030

"132-01-01

Wm M McMahon Jr

226,456.21

Adjustments made to posted checks (Interest Only)

"133-01-01

Jumbalaya J's

15,000.00

 

"143-01-01

Inglis Cottages

50,000.00

 

"144-01-01

Elm View Apts

570,000.00

Forgiven 1/30/2026

"144-02-01

Elm View Apts

200,000.00

Forgiven 1/30/2011

"146-01-01

Century Hall Assoc

80,000.00

First Payment Due 1/1/2011

"146-02-01

Century Hall Assoc

345,000.00

First Payment Due 1/1/2011

"147-01-01

"147-02-01

"149-01-01

Berks Women in Crisis

Berks Women in Crisis Beacon House

344,101.00

 

210,000.00

First Payment Due 11/4/2028

$100,000 Forgiven @ 10%/Year First Payment Due 3/1/2007

"150-01-01

Market Square

900,000.00

Principal Due 12/31/2026

"151-01-01

Bookbindery

175,000.00

First Payment Due 12/21/2006

"151-03-01

Bookbindery

325,000.00

First Payment Due 1/1/2006

"152-01-01

Penn's Common Court Apts

740,000.00

First Payment Due 10/23/2006

"153-01-01

Wood St Assoc

150,000.00

First Payment Due 2/3/2013

B04MC420013A

Goggleworks Venture LLP

3,457,000.00

Variable Libor+0.20% - Maturity date 08/01/2025

B04MC420013

Reading's Future LLC

2,000,000.00

Fixed @ 2.7% - Maturity date08/01/2025

B02MC420013

Buttonwood Gateway

1,868,000.00

Variable Libor+0.20% - Maturity date 08/01/2024

B06MC420013

Goggleworks Apts

454,000.00

Variable Libor+0.20% - Maturity date 08/01/2029

B05MC420013

Doubletree (1)

1,500,000.00

Variable Libor+0.20% - Maturity date 08/01/2031

B13MC420013

Doubletree (2)

1,750,000.00

Variable Libor+0.20% - Maturity date 08/01/2034

B10MC420013

Penn Square

1,500,000.00

Variable Libor+0.20% - Maturity date 08/01/2035

 

FBL-1

GRILLTHENCHILL

168,926.25

3% - Maturity date 10/01/2030

FBL-2

PENNSQUARE

300,000.00

3% - Maturity date 11/30/2030

FBL-3

READINGSODA

400,000.00

3% - Maturity date 11/01/2024

FBL-4

READINGHOSPITALITY

138,043.78

3% - Maturity date 11/21/2024

 

Total Principal Balance

  
 

Outstanding

21,656,355.49