PY2014 to PY2018 City and County Consolidated Plan

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

Executive Summary

 

ES-05 Executive Summary - 24 CFR 91.200(c), 91.220(b)

1.                   Introduction

 

Berks County and the City of Reading, Pennsylvania have prepared a joint Five Year Strategic Plan in order to strategically implement federal programs that fund housing and community and economic development activities within the whole community. Recognizing the need for more efficiency and the effectiveness of the various HUD and non-HUD programs that the City of Reading and the County of Berks utilize, both entitlements have undertaken an effort to increase cooperation between the two community development offices. This cooperation focuses on the sharing of administrative duties, pooling resources and joint decision making. Through a collaborative planning process, involving a broad range of public and private agencies, the County and the City have developed a single, consolidated planning and application document for the use of federal entitlement funds available through the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Program and the HOME Investment Partnerships  Program. Berks County will submit this 5 Year Strategic Plan to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).

 

The Five Year CP will serve the following functions.

 

·         A planning document that enables the County and City to view its HUD funding, not in isolation, but as one tool in a comprehensive strategy to address housing, community development, and economic development needs.

·         An application for CDBG, HOME and ESG Programs funds.

·         A strategy document to be followed in carrying out HUD programs.

 

An action plan that provides a basis for assessing performance in carrying out use of CDBG, HOME and ESG Program funds.


 

City of Reading QuickFacts

 

City of Reading Business QuickFacts


 

City of Reading Geography QuickFacts

 

2.                   Summary of the objectives and outcomes identified in the Plan

 

The federal funds made available to each the City and County through the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG), HOME Investment Partnership Program (HOME) and Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG) Program will be used over the next five years to address the needs outlined in the Strategic Plan. The three overarching objectives guiding the proposed activities are: Providing Decent Affordable Housing, Creating Suitable Living Environments, Creating Economic Opportunities. Outcomes show how programs and activities benefit a community or the people served. The three outcomes that will illustrate the benefits of each activity funded by the CDBG program are: Improve Availability/Accessibility, Improve Affordability, Improve Sustainability. All future activities funded in the next five years will support at least one objective and one outcome. The framework for realizing the objective and outcomes include the following goals: provision of decent, affordable housing; increase homeownership; provision of a suitable living environment; expansion of economic opportunities; and support County-wide efforts to end homelessness. The following are the goals for housing, community development, homeless and special needs, and public and assisted housing: Retain existing housing stock provide rehabilitation assistance for both owner and renter occupied housing. In Reading, stabilize housing through concentrated code enforcement in targeted areas. Development of additional affordable housing support development of housing by private investment and non-profit organizations.


Development of rental housing utilize CHDOs and nonprofit organizations develop housing facilities for special needs and very low income and low income renters. Support Homebuyers assistance provide down payment and closing cost assistance for low and moderate-income homebuyers. Public facilities/infrastructure improvements, leverage local funding for facilities for youth, downtown business districts, sidewalk, street, water, sewer and drainage improvements. Public services continue to support a wide range of public services. Housing facilities Assist private, non-profit developers leverage other public and private funding to develop permanent supportive housing. Rent subsidized units Support the Public Housing Authorities in the expansion of the Section 8 Voucher program Modernization of existing units continue to support the use of Capital Funds and Public Housing Modernization funds to maintain and modernize the public Housing stock. Resident Services - Support resident services to encourage independent living.

 

3.                   Evaluation of past performance

 

Even with continuing decreased funding from Congress, the County and the City have continued to use federal entitlement funds for the benefit of its citizens. Fewer and fewer dollars have required the County and City to evaluate its use of these funds and ensure they are being spent in the most productive manner and for projects that serve a wider number of residents.

 

Due to the unforeseen federal entitlement funding cuts Both the County of Berks and the City of Reading have not been able to accomplish all of the goals set forth in the previous five year Consolidated Plan.

 

4.                   Summary of citizen participation process and consultation process

 

The development of the 2014-2018 Plan is built upon a number of other studies, plans and reports that been prepared over the past year, including: County-wide Needs Assessment, 2007/2008 United Way Community Issues and Outcomes, 2008-2011 Berks County Comprehensive Plan 2020, City of Reading Comprehensive Plan 2000, Berks Coalition to End Homelessness: Plan to End Homelessness, Berks County Continuum of Care application. Input was sought from local municipalities and two public hearings were held. The local municipalities were notified of the public hearings and an announcement was made in the Reading Eagle.

 

5.                   Summary of public comments

 

One City citizen mailed letter suggesting use of funds.

 

6.                   Summary of comments or views not accepted and the reasons for not accepting them

 

All comments and views received were accepted.

 

7.                   Summary


The Five Year Consolidated Plan will serve the following functions. A planning document that enables the County and City to view its HUD funding, not in isolation, but as one tool in a comprehensive strategy to address housing, community development, and economic development needs. An application for CDBG, HOME and ESG Programs funds. A strategy document to be followed in carrying out HUD programs. An action plan that provides a basis for assessing performance in carrying out use of CDBG, HOME and ESG Program funds.


 

The Process

 

PR-05 Lead & Responsible Agencies - 24 CFR 91.200(b)

1.          Describe agency/entity responsible for preparing the Consolidated Plan and those responsible for administration of each grant program and funding source

The following are the agencies/entities responsible for preparing the Consolidated Plan and those responsible for administration of each grant program and funding source.

 

Agency Role

Name

Department/Agency

Lead  Agency

BERKS COUNTY

 

CDBG Administrator

 

 

HOPWA Administrator

 

 

HOME Administrator

 

 

HOPWA-C Administrator

 

 

Table 1 Responsible Agencies

 

Narrative

 

The Community Development Office of Berks County is responsible for the proper administration of the CDBG, ESG, and HOME Program funds outlined in this Plan.  The Office was established in 1988 and since that time has had no major findings or issues with administration.

 

The Consolidated Plan was done in partnership with the City of Reading’s Community Development Department.

 

Consolidated Plan Public Contact Information

 

Kenneth L. Pick, C.D. Director Community Development Office County Services Center -14th Floor 633 Court Street

Reading, PA 19601

 

Office: 610-478-6325

 

FAX: 610-478-6326


PR-10 Consultation - 91.100, 91.200(b), 91.215(I)

1.                   Introduction

 

This section discusses the consultation process used by the City and County for the development of the Joint Consolidated Plan.

 

Provide a concise summary of the jurisdiction’s activities to enhance coordination between public and assisted housing providers and private and governmental health, mental health and service agencies (91.215(I)).

 

Through memebrships in various interest groups, community groups, and organizations, both the City of Reading and the County of Berks believe the current coordination efforts are sufficient.  However, over the time period of the Joint Consolidated Plan, both entities seek new and improved methods to enhance coordination.

 

Describe coordination with the Continuum of Care and efforts to address the needs of homeless persons (particularly chronically homeless individuals and families, families with children, veterans, and unaccompanied youth) and persons at risk of homelessness

 

The local Continuum of Care is led by the Berks Coalition to End Homelessness (BCEH), a nonprofit agency conceived and founded by local social service agencies working toward an end to homelessness. There are currently 60 agencies that are members of the Coalition, along with former homeless members, the County and City governments, and other interested individuals. The City and the County government both coordinate their funding plans with BCEH, and ask BCEH to make recommendations with regard to HAP (Homeless Assistance Program), ESG (Emergency Solutions Grant) and other funding decisions. Most recently, BCEH approved and adopted its 5-year Strategic Plan for preventing, reducing, and ending homelessness. One of our local agencies leads the region in the Supportive Services for Veterans Families Grant for housing homeless vets. Another leads the region in teen intervention for homeless youth. As for chronic homelessness, we have 65 beds available, and are planning for 13 more this year.

 

Describe consultation with the Continuum(s) of Care that serves the jurisdiction's area in determining how to allocate ESG funds, develop performance standards and evaluate outcomes, and develop funding, policies and procedures for the administration of HMIS

 

The City of Reading and County of Berks consults with the local CoC in several ways. We share annual applications for ESG funding with the CoC and solicit their recommendations for use of funds based on the applications received from eligible organizations. These recommendations are then incorporated into our annual action plan. The development of performance standards, evaluation of outcomes, and


development of funding as well as policies and procedures for the administration of HMIS is all facilitated by the Berks Coalition to End Homelessness (BCEH) on behalf of our local CoC.

 

2.                   Describe Agencies, groups, organizations and others who participated in the process and describe the jurisdictions consultations with housing, social service agencies and other entities


 

1

Agency/Group/Organization

Berks Coalition to End Homelessness

 

Agency/Group/Organization Type

Planning organization

 

What section of the Plan was addressed by Consultation?

Homelessness Strategy Homeless Needs - Chronically homeless

Homeless Needs - Families with children

Homelessness Needs - Veterans Homelessness Needs - Unaccompanied youth

Non-Homeless Special Needs

 

How was the Agency/Group/Organization consulted and what are the anticipated outcomes of the consultation or areas for improved coordination?

Incoporation of Strategic Plan and review of ESG Program funding.

Table 2 Agencies, groups, organizations who participated

 

 

Identify any Agency Types not consulted and provide rationale for not consulting

 

None

 

 

 

Other local/regional/state/federal planning efforts considered when preparing the Plan

 

Name of Plan

Lead Organization

How do the goals of your Strategic Plan overlap with the goals of each plan?

Continuum of Care

 

 

Market Value Analysis

Reading Redevelopment Authority

Areas were reviewed for possible investment in development

Community Health Needs Assessment

United Way of Berks County

Public service related goals of strategic plan were compared with assessment.

Table 3 Other local / regional / federal planning efforts

Describe cooperation and coordination with other public entities, including the State and any adjacent units of general local government, in the implementation of the Consolidated Plan (91.215(l))

 

Letters and copies of the Plan were sent to adjacent counties.

 

Narrative


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consolidated Plan                                                   BERKS COUNTY                                                                                        12


 

PR-15 Citizen Participation - 91.105, 91.200 ( c )

1.          Summary of citizen participation process/Efforts made to broaden citizen participation Summarize citizen participation process and how it impacted goal-setting

 

 

2 public hearings, copies of plan mailed to organizations and adjacent municipalities, plan on internet pages. No input from the public changed the goals established.

 

 

 

 

 

Citizen Participation Outreach

 

Sort Order

Mode of Outreach

Target of Outreach

Summary of response/attendance

Summary of comments received

Summary of comments not accepted

and reasons

URL (If

applicable)

1

Public Meeting

Persons with disabilities

 

Non- targeted/broad community

very few memebers of the general public attended the hearings or submitted comments.

One written suggesting use of funds.

None

 

Table 4 Citizen Participation Outreach

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consolidated Plan                                                   BERKS COUNTY                                                                                        13


Needs Assessment

 

NA-05 Overview

Needs Assessment Overview

 

Retain existing housing stock provide rehabilitation assistance for both owner and renter occupied housing. In Reading, stabilize housing through code enforcement in targeted areas.

 

Development of additional affordable housing support development of housing by private investment and non-profit organizations.

 

Development of rental housing utilize CHDO’s and nonprofit organizations develop housing facilities for special needs and very low income and low income renters.

 

Support Homebuyer’s assistance provide down payment and closing cost assistance for low and moderate-income homebuyers.


NA-10 Housing Needs Assessment - 24 CFR 91.205 (a,b,c)

Summary of Housing Needs

 

HUD has determined that certain criteria result in housing problems for various household types.  These criteria include cost burden (paying more than 30% or more than 50% of gross household income for housing costs); occupying a substandard dwelling unit (lacking complete plumbing or kitchen facilities); or, being overcrowded (having more than one person per room). This data is the most current information available on which to base the housing needs assessment.

 

The following tables provide a summary of the number of households in each income category by tenure and household type and the percent of such households that had a housing problem in 2010. The needs of various households, by household type within each income category, are described. The extent to which the households within each group are cost burdened and extremely cost burdened, and/or living in substandard housing, is examined.  Also, the extent to which such problems impact minority households is reviewed.

 

 

 

 

Demographics

Base Year: 2000

Most Recent Year: 2009

% Change

Population

373,636

401,488

7%

Households

150,221

150,225

0%

Median Income

$0.00

$0.00

 

Table 5 - Housing Needs Assessment Demographics

 

Alternate Data Source Name:

2009-2011 American Community Survey

Data Source Comments:


 

NA-10 City of Reading

Number of Households Table

 

 

0-30% HAMFI

>30-50% HAMFI

>50-80% HAMFI

>80-100% HAMFI

>100% HAMFI

Total Households *

15,521

17,555

27,445

15,431

 

Small Family Households *

4,528

4,789

9,537

52,173

 

Large Family Households *

1,345

1,574

2,524

7,478

 

Household contains at least one person 62-74 years of age

 

2,607

 

3,426

 

5,028

 

2,633

 

10,894

Household contains at least one person age 75 or older

 

3,086

 

5,033

 

5,357

 

1,733

 

5,169

Households with one or more children 6 years old or younger *

 

3,162

 

3,217

 

4,306

 

14,173

 

* the highest income

category for

these family t

ypes is >80%

HAMFI

 


 

Data Source:    2005-2009 CHAS


Table 6 - Total Households Table


 

Number of Households - City of Reading

Housing Needs Summary Tables

 

1.   Housing Problems (Households with one of the listed needs)

 

 

 

 

Renter

 

 

 

 

Owner

 

 

 

0-30% AMI

>30-

50% AMI

>50-

80% AMI

>80-

100% AMI

Total

0-30% AMI

>30-

50% AMI

>50-

80% AMI

>80-

100% AMI

Total

NUMBER OF HOUSEHOLDS

Substandard Housing - Lacking complete plumbing or kitchen facilities

 

 

 

 

 

251

 

 

 

 

 

268

 

 

 

 

 

178

 

 

 

 

 

110

 

 

 

 

 

807

 

 

 

 

 

32

 

 

 

 

 

85

 

 

 

 

 

84

 

 

 

 

 

60

 

 

 

 

 

261

Severely Overcrowded - With >1.51 people per room (and complete kitchen and plumbing)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

235

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

45

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

55

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

335

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

50

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

70

Overcrowded - With 1.01-1.5

people per room (and none of the above problems)

 

 

 

 

 

210

 

 

 

 

 

309

 

 

 

 

 

96

 

 

 

 

 

10

 

 

 

 

 

625

 

 

 

 

 

49

 

 

 

 

 

212

 

 

 

 

 

169

 

 

 

 

 

66

 

 

 

 

 

496

Housing cost burden greater than 50% of income (and none of the above problems)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5,624

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1,467

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

257

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

19

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7,367

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3,827

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2,431

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2,209

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

567

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9,034

Housing cost burden greater than 30% of income (and none of the above problems)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1,187

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3,566

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2,480

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

181

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7,414

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1,099

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3,282

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4,830

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3,407

 

 

 

 

 

12,61

8


 

 

 

 

Renter

 

 

 

 

Owner

 

 

 

0-30% AMI

>30-

50% AMI

>50-

80% AMI

>80-

100% AMI

Total

0-30% AMI

>30-

50% AMI

>50-

80% AMI

>80-

100% AMI

Total

Zero/negative Income (and none of the above problems)

 

 

 

 

300

 

 

 

 

0

 

 

 

 

0

 

 

 

 

0

 

 

 

 

300

 

 

 

 

429

 

 

 

 

0

 

 

 

 

0

 

 

 

 

0

 

 

 

 

429


 

Data Source:


 

2005-2009 CHAS


Table 7 Housing Problems Table


 

Housing Needs Summary Tables

 

2.   Housing Problems 2 (Households with one or more Severe Housing Problems: Lacks kitchen


or complete plumbing, severe overcrowding, severe cost burden)

 

 

 

 

Renter

 

 

 

 

Owner

 

 

 

0-30% AMI

>30-

50% AMI

>50-

80% AMI

>80-

100% AMI

Total

0-30% AMI

>30-

50% AMI

>50-

80% AMI

>80-

100% AMI

Total

NUMBER OF HOUSEHOLDS

Having 1 or more of four housing problems

 

 

 

6,323

 

 

 

2,091

 

 

 

586

 

 

 

139

 

 

 

9,139

 

 

 

3,931

 

 

 

2,758

 

 

 

2,509

 

 

 

698

 

 

 

9,896

Having none of four housing problems

 

 

2,805

 

 

5,917

 

 

8,772

 

 

3,412

 

 

20,906

 

 

1,700

 

 

6,792

 

 

15,539

 

 

11,179

 

 

35,210

Household has negative income, but none of the other housing problems

 

 

 

 

 

 

300

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

300

 

 

 

 

 

 

429

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

429


 

Data Source:


 

2005-2009 CHAS


Table 8 Housing Problems 2


 

Housing Problems - City of Reading

3.   Cost Burden > 30%

 

 

Renter

Owner

0-30% AMI

>30-50% AMI

>50-80% AMI

Total

0-30% AMI

>30-50% AMI

>50-80% AMI

Total

NUMBER OF HOUSEHOLDS

Small Related

2,810

2,079

961

5,850

1,073

1,358

3,496

5,927

Large Related

755

281

166

1,202

457

768

861

2,086

Elderly

1,469

1,567

840

3,876

2,680

2,727

1,441

6,848

Other

2,428

1,467

852

4,747

817

1,025

1,266

3,108

Total need by income

7,462

5,394

2,819

15,675

5,027

5,878

7,064

17,969


 

Data Source:


 

2005-2009 CHAS


Table 9 Cost Burden > 30%


 

Cost Burden > 30% - City of Reading

4.   Cost Burden > 50%

 

 

Renter

Owner

0-30% AMI

>30-50% AMI

>50-

80% AMI

Total

0-30% AMI

>30-50% AMI

>50-80% AMI

Total

NUMBER OF HOUSEHOLDS

Small Related

2,430

513

33

2,976

910

761

1,111

2,782

Large Related

530

12

4

546

277

389

227

893

Elderly

1,018

611

184

1,813

1,983

849

379

3,211

Other

2,103

443

85

2,631

715

500

503

1,718

Total need by income

6,081

1,579

306

7,966

3,885

2,499

2,220

8,604


 

Data Source:


 

2005-2009 CHAS


Table 10 Cost Burden > 50%


 

Cost Burden > 50% - City of Reading

5.   Crowding (More than one person per room)

 

 

 

 

Renter

 

 

 

 

Owner

 

 

 

0-

30% AMI

>30-

50% AMI

>50-

80% AMI

>80-

100% AMI

Total

0-

30% AMI

>30-

50% AMI

>50-

80% AMI

>80-

100% AMI

Total

NUMBER OF HOUSEHOLDS

Single family households

 

400

 

264

 

130

 

0

 

794

 

45

 

214

 

159

 

66

 

484

Multiple, unrelated family households

 

35

 

55

 

40

 

10

 

140

 

4

 

22

 

59

 

0

 

85

Other, non-family households

 

10

 

35

 

30

 

0

 

75

 

10

 

0

 

0

 

0

 

10

Total need by income

445

354

200

10

1,009

59

236

218

66

579


 

Data Source:


 

2005-2009 CHAS


Table 11 Crowding Information 1/2


 

Crowding - City of Reading

 

 

Renter

Owner

0-30%

>30-

>50-

Total

0-30%

>30-

>50-

Total

AMI

50%

80%

AMI

50%

80%

AMI

AMI

AMI

AMI

Households with Children Present

 

0

 

0

 

0

 

0

 

0

 

0

 

0

 

0


 

Data Source Comments:


Table 12 Crowding Information 2/2


 

 

Describe the number and type of single person households in need of housing assistance.

 

Estimate the number and type of families in need of housing assistance who are disabled or victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking.

What are the most common housing problems?

 

Deterioration of the existing housing stock and lack of income to afford housing are the two most common housing problems: 4,265 renter occupied households experience a housing cost burden greater than 50% of income; 3,290 renter occupied households experience a housing cost burden greater than 30% of income; 1,615 owner occupied households experience a housing cost burden greater than 50%  of income; and 3,290 owner occupied households experience a housing cost burden greater than 30% of income.

 

For data specific to the City of Reading, see attached charts.

 

Are any populations/household types more affected than others by these problems?

 

No

 

Describe the characteristics and needs of Low-income individuals and families with children (especially extremely low-income) who are currently housed but are at imminent risk of either residing in shelters or becoming unsheltered 91.205(c)/91.305(c)). Also discuss the needs of formerly homeless families and individuals who are receiving rapid re-housing assistance and are nearing the termination of that assistance

 

The City of Reading has a high population of single mothers with children. In addition, Reading is ranked number 2 in the Commonwealth of PA for single mothers without a high school diploma. Most of these women eventually find one of the agencies in the City who handle the ESG funding for HUD. This funding pays for rental assistance or utility assistance for those with evictions or shut-offs. Most of these clients are unable to work because of the needs of the children, which keeps their options limited. Most subsist on TANF or cash assistance, SNAP, and/or SSI. Homeless families or individuals who received rapid re- housing assistance face different challenges. It assumed that most of these families engaged in this


service because of a job loss or other sudden loss of income. In most cases these families were stable prior to the incident. Their assistance is assumed to be short-lived to get them over a certain period of instability. Their assistance was never intended to be long term whereas in the previous instance, assistance is usually needed more than once.

 

If a jurisdiction provides estimates of the at-risk population(s), it should also include a description of the operational definition of the at-risk group and the methodology used to generate the estimates:

 

N/A

 

Specify particular housing characteristics that have been linked with instability and an increased risk of homelessness

 

Most people experiencing housing crisis usually show instability in many other aspects of their lives; unstable job history, unstable relationships, lack of sufficient income. In addition, if the property itself is not well-maintained, chances are the people living there are doing so because of a lack of choices. BCEH works closely with Codes Enforcement to insure that those being funded are done through landlords that follow the proper regulations.

 

Discussion

 

None


NA-15 Disproportionately Greater Need: Housing Problems - 91.205(b) (2)

Assess the need of any racial or ethnic group that has disproportionately greater need in comparison to the needs of that category of need as a whole.

Introduction

 

There does not appear to be racial or ethnic groups that have disaproportianately greater need in comparisaon to the needs of that category of need as a whole.

 

0%-30% of Area Median Income

 

Housing Problems

Has one or more of four housing problems

Has none of the four housing problems

Household has no/negative income, but none of the other housing problems

Jurisdiction as a whole

18,970

3,440

1,040

White

9,290

1,985

690

Black / African American

1,875

130

23

Asian

105

50

14

American Indian, Alaska Native

180

0

0

Pacific Islander

0

0

0

Hispanic

7,315

1,260

300


 

Data Source:    2005-2009 CHAS


Table 13 - Disproportionally Greater Need 0 - 30% AMI


 

*The four housing problems are:

1. Lacks complete kitchen facilities, 2. Lacks complete plumbing facilities, 3. More than one person per room, 4.Cost Burden greater than 30%


 

NA - 15 - City of Reading

30%-50% of Area Median Income

 

Housing Problems

Has one or more of four housing problems

Has none of the four housing problems

Household has no/negative income, but none of the other housing problems

Jurisdiction as a whole

15,745

7,995

0

White

10,025

5,230

0

Black / African American

940

600

0

Asian

129

8

0

American Indian, Alaska Native

25

0

0

Pacific Islander

0

0

0

Hispanic

4,495

2,080

0


 

Data Source:    2005-2009 CHAS


Table 14 - Disproportionally Greater Need 30 - 50% AMI


 

*The four housing problems are:

1. Lacks complete kitchen facilities, 2. Lacks complete plumbing facilities, 3. More than one person per room, 4.Cost Burden greater than 30%


 

30% - 50% of Area - City of Reading

50%-80% of Area Median Income

 

Housing Problems

Has one or more of four housing problems

Has none of the four housing problems

Household has no/negative income, but none of the other housing problems

Jurisdiction as a whole

12,110

21,675

0

White

9,325

16,200

0

Black / African American

735

1,390

0

Asian

102

125

0

American Indian, Alaska Native

10

0

0

Pacific Islander

0

0

0

Hispanic

1,820

3,835

0


 

Data Source:    2005-2009 CHAS


Table 15 - Disproportionally Greater Need 50 - 80% AMI


 

*The four housing problems are:

1. Lacks complete kitchen facilities, 2. Lacks complete plumbing facilities, 3. More than one person per room, 4.Cost Burden greater than 30%


 

50% - 80% of Area - City of Reading

80%-100% of Area Median Income

 

Housing Problems

Has one or more of four housing problems

Has none of the four housing problems

Household has no/negative income, but none of the other housing problems

Jurisdiction as a whole

4,660

13,320

0

White

3,975

10,595

0

Black / African American

250

545

0

Asian

124

80

0

American Indian, Alaska Native

4

0

0

Pacific Islander

0

0

0

Hispanic

300

1,985

0


 

Data Source:    2005-2009 CHAS


Table 16 - Disproportionally Greater Need 80 - 100% AMI


 

*The four housing problems are:

1. Lacks complete kitchen facilities, 2. Lacks complete plumbing facilities, 3. More than one person per room, 4.Cost Burden greater than 30%


 

80% - 100% of Area - City of Reading

 

Discussion


None


NA-20 Disproportionately Greater Need: Severe Housing Problems: 91.205 (b) (2)

Assess the need of any racial or ethnic group that has disproportionately greater need in comparison to the needs of that category of need as a whole.

Introduction

 

There does not appear to be any racial or ethnic group that has a disproportionately greater need in comparison to the needs of the entire population.

 

0%-30% of Area Median Income

 

Severe Housing Problems*

Has one or more of four housing problems

Has none of the four housing problems

Household has no/negative income, but none of the other housing problems

Jurisdiction as a whole

15,515

6,900

1,040

White

7,595

3,675

690

Black / African American

1,645

365

23

Asian

60

100

14

American Indian, Alaska Native

130

40

0

Pacific Islander

0

0

0

Hispanic

5,885

2,690

300


 

Data Source:    2005-2009 CHAS


Table 17 Severe Housing Problems 0 - 30% AMI


 

*The four severe housing problems are:

1. Lacks complete kitchen facilities, 2. Lacks complete plumbing facilities, 3. More than 1.5 persons per room, 4.Cost Burden over 50%


 

NA - 20 - City of Reading

30%-50% of Area Median Income

 

Severe Housing Problems*

Has one or more of four housing problems

Has none of the four housing problems

Household has no/negative income, but none of the other housing problems

Jurisdiction as a whole

6,245

17,500

0

White

3,715

11,540

0

Black / African American

510

1,040

0

Asian

99

38

0

American Indian, Alaska Native

4

20

0

Pacific Islander

0

0

0

Hispanic

1,835

4,750

0


 

Data Source:    2005-2009 CHAS


Table 18 Severe Housing Problems 30 - 50% AMI


 

*The four severe housing problems are:

1. Lacks complete kitchen facilities, 2. Lacks complete plumbing facilities, 3. More than 1.5 persons per room, 4.Cost Burden over 50%


 

30% - 50% of Area - City of Reading

50%-80% of Area Median Income

 

Severe Housing Problems*

Has one or more of four housing problems

Has none of the four housing problems

Household has no/negative income, but none of the other housing problems

Jurisdiction as a whole

3,490

30,295

0

White

2,725

22,805

0

Black / African American

139

1,975

0

Asian

74

145

0

American Indian, Alaska Native

0

10

0

Pacific Islander

0

0

0

Hispanic

525

5,125

0


 

Data Source:    2005-2009 CHAS


Table 19 Severe Housing Problems 50 - 80% AMI


 

*The four severe housing problems are:

1. Lacks complete kitchen facilities, 2. Lacks complete plumbing facilities, 3. More than 1.5 persons per room, 4.Cost Burden over 50%


 

50% - 80% of Area - City of Reading

80%-100% of Area Median Income

 

Severe Housing Problems*

Has one or more of four housing problems

Has none of the four housing problems

Household has no/negative income, but none of the other housing problems

Jurisdiction as a whole

875

17,100

0

White

765

13,810

0

Black / African American

40

760

0

Asian

4

200

0

American Indian, Alaska Native

0

4

0

Pacific Islander

0

0

0

Hispanic

65

2,220

0


 

Data Source:    2005-2009 CHAS


Table 20 Severe Housing Problems 80 - 100% AMI


 

 

*The four severe housing problems are:

1. Lacks complete kitchen facilities, 2. Lacks complete plumbing facilities, 3. More than 1.5 persons per room, 4.Cost Burden over 50%


 

80% - 100% of Area - City of Reading

 

Discussion


None


NA-25 Disproportionately Greater Need: Housing Cost Burdens - 91.205 (b) (2)

Assess the need of any racial or ethnic group that has disproportionately greater need in comparison to the needs of that category of need as a whole.

Introduction

 

No racial or ethnic group that has disproportionately greater need in comparison to the needs of that category of need as a whole.  A disproportionately greater need exists when the percentage of persons in a category of need who are members of a particular racial/ethnic group is at least 10% points higher than the percentage of persons in the category as a whole.

 

Housing Cost Burden

 

Housing Cost Burden

<=30%

30-50%

>50%

No / negative income (not computed)

Jurisdiction as a whole

120,400

33,140

23,915

1,040

White

100,160

24,195

14,415

690

Black / African American

4,590

1,775

2,240

23

Asian

1,220

370

145

14

American Indian, Alaska Native

 

0

 

75

 

134

 

0

Pacific Islander

38

0

0

0

Hispanic

13,665

6,505

6,730

300


 

Data Source:    2005-2009 CHAS


Table 21 Greater Need: Housing Cost Burdens AMI


 

NA - 25 - City of Reading

 

Discussion


None


NA-30 Disproportionately Greater Need: Discussion - 91.205 (b)(2)

Are there any Income categories in which a racial or ethnic group has disproportionately greater need than the needs of that income category as a whole?

 

Regardless of race or ethnicity, persons at or below 50% AMI have a greater need than the remaining income levels.

 

If they have needs not identified above, what are those needs?

 

None

 

Are any of those racial or ethnic groups located in specific areas or neighborhoods in your community?

 

No

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consolidated Plan                                                   BERKS COUNTY                                                                                        53


 

NA-35 Public Housing - 91.205 (b)

Introduction

 

The City of Reading is served by the Reading Housing Authority (RHA). The boroughs and townships of Berks County are served by the Berks County Housing Authority (BCHA).  The data below reflects combined information of RHA and BCHA.

 

Totals in Use

 

Program Type

 

Certificate

Mod- Rehab

Public Housing

Vouchers

Total

Project - based

Tenant - based

Special Purpose Voucher

Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing

Family Unification Program

Disabled

*

# of units vouchers in use

0

0

1,786

1,191

3

1,177

8

0

0

Table 22 - Public Housing by Program Type

*includes Non-Elderly Disabled, Mainstream One-Year, Mainstream Five-year, and Nursing Home Transition

 

Data Source:             PIC (PIH Information Center)

 

 

 

 

 

Consolidated Plan                                                   BERKS COUNTY                                                                                        54


 

 

 

 

 

 


55


 

NA - 35 - City of Reading

 

Characteristics of Residents

 

Program Type

 

Certificate

Mod- Rehab

Public Housing

Vouchers

Total

Project - based

Tenant - based

Special Purpose Voucher

Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing

Family Unification Program

# Homeless at admission

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

# of Elderly Program Participants (>62)

 

0

 

0

 

480

 

300

 

0

 

298

 

1

 

0

# of Disabled Families

0

0

698

326

0

320

4

0

# of Families requesting accessibility features

 

0

 

0

 

1,786

 

1,191

 

3

 

1,177

 

8

 

0

# of HIV/AIDS program participants

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

# of DV victims

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Table 23 Characteristics of Public Housing Residents by Program Type

 

 

 

Data Source:             PIC (PIH Information Center)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consolidated Plan                                                   BERKS COUNTY                                                                      56

OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015)


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


57


 

Characteristics - City of Reading

 

Race of Residents

 

Program Type

Race

Certificate

Mod- Rehab

Public Housing

Vouchers

Total

Project - based

Tenant - based

Special Purpose Voucher

Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing

Family Unification Program

Disabled

*

White

0

0

1,584

965

3

957

2

0

0

Black/African American

0

0

184

218

0

212

6

0

0

Asian

0

0

8

3

0

3

0

0

0

American Indian/Alaska Native

 

0

 

0

 

7

 

3

 

0

 

3

 

0

 

0

 

0

Pacific Islander

0

0

3

2

0

2

0

0

0

Other

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

*includes Non-Elderly Disabled, Mainstream One-Year, Mainstream Five-year, and Nursing Home Transition


 

Data Source:             PIC (PIH Information Center)


Table 24 Race of Public Housing Residents by Program Type


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consolidated Plan                                                   BERKS COUNTY                                                                      58

OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015)


 

 

 

 

 

 

 


59


 

Race - City of Reading

 

Ethnicity of Residents

 

Program Type

Ethnicity

Certificate

Mod- Rehab

Public Housing

Vouchers

Total

Project - based

Tenant - based

Special Purpose Voucher

Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing

Family Unification Program

Disabled

*

Hispanic

0

0

1,221

589

1

585

1

0

0

Not Hispanic

0

0

565

602

2

592

7

0

0

*includes Non-Elderly Disabled, Mainstream One-Year, Mainstream Five-year, and Nursing Home Transition


 

Data Source:             PIC (PIH Information Center)


Table 25 Ethnicity of Public Housing Residents by Program Type


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consolidated Plan                                                   BERKS COUNTY                                                                      60

OMB Control No: 2506-0117 (exp. 07/31/2015)


 

 

 

 

 

 

 


61


 

Ethnicity - City of Reading

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consolidated Plan                                                   BERKS COUNTY                                                                      62


Section 504 Needs Assessment: Describe the needs of public housing tenants and applicants on the waiting list for accessible units:

 

Berks County Housing Authority The non-elderly need living wage jobs. The elderly need safe, affordable housing.

 

For public housing tenants serviced by the Reading Housing Authority, it is unknown how many applicant households have a need for an accessible unit as this information is not collected at the time of pre-application.

 

What are the number and type of families on the waiting lists for public housing and section 8 tenant-based rental assistance? Based on the information above, and any other information available to the jurisdiction, what are the most immediate needs of residents of public housing and Housing Choice voucher holders?

 

Berks County Housing Authority On the current waiting lists of BCHA, there are 21 Public Housing applicants and 31 HCV Program applicants that have indicated the need for accessibility features. All applicants on the waiting list require jobs that pay a living wage as well as safe, affordable housing.

 

For the Reading Housing Authority, as of 9/18/13, the Public Housing and Section 8 Waiting List is as follows:

 

Based on the information above, the need for assisted units is most significant for families that qualify for 1-, 2- and 3-bedroom units.

 

How do these needs compare to the housing needs of the population at large

 

The population at large has many similiar needs.

 

Discussion

 

Both the City of Reading and the County of Berks continue to assist in economic development efforts and projects that will increase employment opportunities. With ever shrinking amounts of federal and state funding for affordable housing, the City and County’s efforts to encourage the development of this type of housing is decreasing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consolidated Plan                                                   BERKS COUNTY                                                                                        63


 

 

NA-40 Homeless Needs Assessment - 91.205 ( c )

Introduction:

 

Below is a sumary of the needs of persons experiencing homelessness or are at risk of homelessness.

 

Homeless Needs Assessment

 

Population

Estimate the # of persons experiencing homelessness on a given night

Estimate the # experiencing homelessness each year;

Estimate the # becoming homeless each year

Estimate the # exiting homelessness each year

Estimate the # of days persons experience homelessness

 

Sheltered

Unsheltered

 

 

 

 

Persons in Households with Adult(s) and Child(ren)

 

100

 

21

 

356

 

0

 

63

 

30

Persons in Households with Only Children

 

0

 

0

 

0

 

0

 

0

 

0

Persons in Households with Only Adults

 

228

 

30

 

1,228

 

0

 

391

 

30

Chronically Homeless Individuals

171

0

171

0

54

75

Chronically Homeless Families

50

0

50

0

16

30

Veterans

33

6

217

0

69

30

Unaccompanied Child

0

0

0

0

0

0

Persons with HIV

0

0

0

0

0

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 26 - Homeless Needs Assessment

 

 

Data Source Comments:       Estimates provided by County staff.

 

 

Indicate if the homeless population is:     Partially Rural Homeless


 

 

 

Rural Homeless Needs Assessment

 

Population

Estimate the # of persons

Estimate the #

Estimate the #

Estimate the #

Estimate the #

experiencing homelessness

experiencing

becoming

exiting

of days persons

on a given night

homelessness

homeless

homelessness

experience

each year

each year

each year

homelessness

 

Sheltered

Unsheltered

 

 

 

 

Persons in Households with Adult(s) and Child(ren)

 

5

 

0

 

25

 

0

 

25

 

0

Persons in Households with Only Children

 

5

 

0

 

25

 

0

 

25

 

0

Persons in Households with Only Adults

 

5

 

0

 

25

 

0

 

25

 

0

Chronically Homeless Individuals

5

0

25

0

25

0

Chronically Homeless Families

5

0

25

0

25

0

Veterans

10

0

50

0

50

0

Unaccompanied Youth

5

0

25

0

25

0

Persons with HIV

0

0

0

0

0

0

 

 

 

 

Data Source Comments:       Estimates provided by County staff.

 

 

For persons in rural areas who are homeless or at risk of homelessness, describe the nature and extent of unsheltered and sheltered homelessness with the jurisdiction:

 

The County covers over 825 square miles. Persons in rural areas who are homeless have proven very difficult to indentify. Many are staying in camp grounds, living in their cars along isolated roads, or sleeping in abandoned buildings. While several attempts have been made over the years, the County has not found


 

a reliable means of assessing the number, nature, or extent of the rural homeless.

 

Those are risk of homelessness are even more difficult to identify given that most do not contact an agency or seek help until they have become homeless.

 

If data is not available for the categories "number of persons becoming and exiting homelessness each year," and "number of days that persons experience homelessness," describe these categories for each homeless population type (including chronically homeless individuals and families, families with children, veterans and their families, and unaccompanied youth):

 

Data not available.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consolidated Plan                                                   BERKS COUNTY                                                                      66


Nature and Extent of Homelessness: (Optional)

 

Race:

Sheltered:

Unsheltered (optional)

White

0

0

Black or African American

0

0

Asian

0

0

American Indian or Alaska Native

 

0

 

0

Pacific Islander

0

0

Ethnicity:

Sheltered:

Unsheltered (optional)

Hispanic

0

0

Not Hispanic

0

0

Data Source Comments:

 

 

Estimate the number and type of families in need of housing assistance for families with children and the families of veterans.

 

500 over the next 5 years.

 

Describe the Nature and Extent of Homelessness by Racial and Ethnic Group.

 

Ethnicity Race NonHispanic - 1171 White, Non-Hispanic 737 Hispanic 479 White, Hispanic 390 Black 375

Asian 5 American Indian 2 Multiple Races 64

 

Describe the Nature and Extent of Unsheltered and Sheltered Homelessness.

 

In the last point in time count, BCEH counted 13 unsheltered homeless. 3 were veterans, 9 were severely mentally ill, and 4 were drug/alcohol dependent. There was a total of 468 persons overall.

 

Discussion:

 

See above.


NA-45 Non-Homeless Special Needs Assessment - 91.205 (b,d)

Introduction

 

This section reviews the issues of non-homeless persons with special needs.

 

 

 

 

Describe the characteristics of special needs populations in your community:

 

Elderly and Frail Elderly - A frail elderly person is defined as one who has one or more limitations of activities of daily living (ADL), and one who may need assistance to perform ADL. Elderly persons may need housing assistance for two reasons financial and supportive.  Supportive housing is needed when an elderly person is both frail and low income, since the housing assistance offers services to compensate for the frailty in addition to financial assistance.

 

The affordable and supportive service needs of the elderly include the following:

 

·         Home maintenance assistance, including minor home repairs is the most needed supportive housing service.

·         Affordable, safe and appropriate housing is needed.

·         Adaptive modifications that allow them to remain in their homes as their physical conditions change should be provided.

·         For people age 75 and over, the need for medical and other types of professional care rises sharply as evidenced by the large number of the elderly age 75 and over with self-care and go- outside the home disabilities.

·         As people live longer, there will likely be more people in need of care because of dementia or other illnesses that diminish their mental capacity.

 

 

 

Persons with Disabilities

 

 

 

The majority of people with psychiatric or developmental disabilities experience housing problems or have housing needs in some form: cost burden; overcrowding; substandard housing; inability to move out of an institutional or residential treatment setting beyond the period of need; and, homelessness.

 

Needs related to housing for persons with disabilities include the following:

 

·         Affordable, safe and appropriate housing.


·         Creative home modification programs for those who acquire a disability as they age or through accident or illness.

·         Accessible housing, particularly for those with severe disabilities.

·         Assistance with one-time rental assistance and security deposits.

·         Varying levels of supportive services adaptable to individual requirements.

·         Effective pathways to ensure consumer information on existing housing programs

·         Services for those who are dually-diagnosed with mental illness and/or substance abuse and/or physical disabilities.

·         Outreach to individuals who resist or cannot access the traditional mental health service system.

·         Convenient transportation available at varied times.

 

 

 

Persons with Mental Illness and Mental Retardation

 

 

 

The Berks County office of Mental Health and Mental Retardation is charged with the responsibility of providing services to persons with Mental Illness and mental retardation who lack the means to receive private funded care. Under the principals of the Olmstead decision, housing in the least restrictive environment under which the person may live safely is sought. De-institutionalization has occurred so that many persons formerly residing in institutions are now supported in independent living in the community.

 

 

 

The housing needs of consumers served by the three ICM/RC/Blended Case Management providers are as follows:

 

 

 

TASC 60 to 70 consumers each year need rent assistance. This is about half their entire population.

 

Drug & Alcohol slots Approximately 50 consumers each year need rent assistance particularly women leaving prison.

 

 

 

SAM Approximately 125 consumers currently receive housing services each year.

 

Milestones is the case management provider agency that services primarily children referred by MH/MR. Approximately 15 families are serviced each year where housing is a need.


What are the housing and supportive service needs of these populations and how are these needs determined?

 

Lower income special needs population is experiencing the issues of lack of affordable housing and lack of sufficent income. These needs are identified in coordination with several community partner agencies and service providers. With the continued decrease in federal, state, and local funds for affordable housing, it is very difficult to address the housing needs of this population.  Many federal and state programs are available to address the supportive service needs of this population.

 

Discuss the size and characteristics of the population with HIV/AIDS and their families within the Eligible Metropolitan Statistical Area:

 

In Pennsylvania, AIDS and HIV infections are reportable conditions. The Pennsylvania Department of Health maintains a registry of reported cases on a County basis.  At the end of 2006 (the most recent date for which data is available), the state reported that there were 354 persons living with HIV and 471 persons living with AIDS in Berks County.

 

 

 

The housing needs and problems of people living with HIV and AIDS are similar to those of people of similar health or socio-economic status. These problems have become more pressing as more people with AIDS live longer. Many people living with HIV and AIDS have other psychosocial, health, and emotional problems such as chemical dependency and mental health problems. Key housing problems include affordability, security, transportation, and child care issues.  Financial constraints are central to most housing issues faced by people living with HIV and AIDS in the community. Financial problems often appear to be accentuated by the inability to work and expenses for medical care and medicines beyond the scope of insurance.

 

 

 

The housing needs of people living with HIV and AIDS are diverse. Housing programs targeting the population need to be flexible enough to address a wide range of needs and problems. Programs should focus on helping people with HIV and AIDS to stay in their own homes.  Housing programs may need to find ways to address underlying causes and related problems such as alcohol and drug services, mental health services, benefits counseling, and public transportation.

 

 

 

Housing programs for persons with HIV and AIDS should include the following:

 

·         Direct financial or in-kind assistance to clients, specifically rental and mortgage assistance.

·         Direct services, specifically case management and in-home services.


·         A flexible indirect assistance component that provides a pool of funds to address multiple housing concerns such as utility assistance, home improvements and renovations.

 

Discussion:

 

None


NA-50 Non-Housing Community Development Needs - 91.215 (f)

Describe the jurisdiction’s need for Public Facilities:

 

Owing to the diverse nature and age of Berks County communities, the non-housing community development needs within the County are varied but there are some common elements. There are needs for public facility improvements in much of the County.

 

Within the City of Reading, the need exists to rehabilitation of park and recreation facilities, the fire stations, and the wastewater treatment plant.

 

How were these needs determined?

 

For Berks County, the needs were determined by the Community Development Office. The needs were determined by the Public Works Department of the City of Reading.

 

 

Describe the jurisdiction’s need for Public Improvements:

 

Owing to the diverse nature and age of Berks County communities, the non-housing community development needs within the County are varied and disparate, but there are some common elements. There are needs for public infrastructure reconstruction in much of the County.

 

For the City of Reading, there is a need for new sidewalks, street paving, tree removals and new tree plantings, and the Installation of energy efficient street lighting

 

How were these needs determined?

 

For Berks County, the needs were determined by the Community Development Office. The needs were determined by the Public Works Department of the City of Reading.

 

 

Describe the jurisdiction’s need for Public Services:

 

Social Service needs will continue to be addressed by the County using federal, state, and local funds other than CBDG, HOME and ESG.

 

Within the City of Reading, the need exists for services such as senior services, handicapped services, legal services, youth services, substance abuse services, employment training, crime awareness, fair


housing activities, tenant/landlord counseling, child care services, mental health services, homeownership assistance for low and moderate income level persons and households.

 

How were these needs determined?

 

For Berks County, the needs were determined by the Community Development Office.

 

The needs were determined by the Community Development Department of the City of Reading in consultation with community members and members of the administration.


 

Housing Market Analysis

 

MA-05 Overview

Housing Market Analysis Overview:

 

Characteristics of Berks County’s existing housing stock are described in this section of the Five Year Strategic Plan.

 

 

 

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) defines affordable housing as housing in good condition that does not cost more than 30% of a household’s annual income. For example, a household with an annual income of $30,000 can spend up to $9,000 per year ($750 per month) on housing.  Anything above that amount would be unaffordable for such a household.  Naturally, not all households make the same amount of money. Therefore, HUD uses the median family income for an area in order to determine what is affordable to the majority of households. While identifying how much a household can afford is a relatively straightforward calculation, it is a lot more difficult to identify how much of the available County housing stock is in good condition and affordable to various income levels.  In addition, it is necessary to determine how much of the existing housing stock is affordable and available for rent versus ownership.


MA-10 Housing Market Analysis: Number of Housing Units - 91.210(a)&(b)(2)

Introduction

 

The Housing Market Analysis indicates the residential units availability, number, size, types, assisted with federal programs, and the number estimated to be lost from the affordable housing inventory.

 

All residential properties by number of units

 

Property Type

Number

%

1-unit detached structure

89,069

56%

1-unit, attached structure

36,895

23%

2-4 units

13,170

8%

5-19 units

9,462

6%

20 or more units

6,087

4%

Mobile Home, boat, RV, van, etc

5,640

4%

Total

160,323

100%


 

Data Source:    2005-2009 ACS Data


Table 27 Residential Properties by Unit Number


 

MA - 10 - City of Reading

Unit Size by Tenure

 

 

Owners

Renters

Number

%

Number

%

No bedroom

88

0%

1,419

4%

1 bedroom

2,094

2%

10,931

28%

2 bedrooms

16,041

14%

14,550

37%

3 or more bedrooms

93,152

84%

11,950

31%

Total

111,375

100%

38,850

100%


 

Data Source:    2005-2009 ACS Data


Table 28 Unit Size by Tenure


 

Unit Size - City of Reading

Describe the number and targeting (income level/type of family served) of units assisted with federal, state, and local programs.

 

The 2000 Census reported that the number of housing units in Berks County increased during the 1990s by 11.7 percent to 150,222.  The 2010 Census reported that the number of housing units in Berks County increased by 9.7 percent to 164,827. The City of Reading's housing stock decreased from 2000 to 2010 by 106 to 34,208. Berks Vision 2020 notes that the rate of increase in housing in Berks County during the 2000s was modest in comparison to the previous decades.

 

Of the 164,827 housing units in Berks County, 128,856 or 78.5 percent were single-family units.  An additional 29,900 of the housing units, or 18.1 percent, were contained in multi-family structures and there were 5,470 mobile homes, which was 3.4 percent of the units.

 

Provide an assessment of units expected to be lost from the affordable housing inventory for any reason, such as expiration